Deck footings dimensionally off


  #1  
Old 05-28-14, 05:50 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Deck footings dimensionally off

Hello!
I am building a new deck and have already made a colossal error. I am searching for help on how to minimize the damage and / or work around it to finish the deck.
The footings are my problem. They were laid out correctly, holes dug to 48”, tubes inserted, concrete mixed, and all went well there. Problem was discovered when I got home from work the next day and realized my concrete guy did not make sure the j-bolts were properly placed.
There are five footings set out 12.5 feet from the house but they are at different distances!
The measurements from the house to the first j-bolt thru the fifth are: 153”, 150.25” 150.25”, 148.25”, and 146”. So from the first bolt to the last I have a difference of 7 inches!

I plan on using deck post anchors from Lowe’s that have the one inch hole in the center to accommodate the j-bolt. One thought I had was punching new holes off center on two of the anchors yet keeping the entire anchor on the concrete pad (to use on the first and fifth j-bolts). Another thought was slightly turning the 6 x 6 posts on the pads to try to minimize the issue.

Any input would greatly help! Thanks in advance.
p.s. don’t call me stupid, I already know that
 
  #2  
Old 05-28-14, 06:50 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,367
Received 2,323 Upvotes on 2,066 Posts
I would work with the most bolts that are in a usable range (keep the two 150.25") and cut off the others flush with the concrete. Then drill and install new anchors in the correct location.
 
  #3  
Old 05-28-14, 11:28 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks!

That is what I will do. I have zero experience with the cutting that I will have to do, but I need to make this right for my wife so I will plug forward! I will get some threaded rod and use something like Quikrete’s High Strength Anchoring Epoxy.
Thanks for your input.
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-14, 02:06 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,607
Upvotes: 0
Received 11 Upvotes on 10 Posts
I would use either wedge anchors or lag shields with lag bolts rather than trying the epoxy route. Not that your method won't work, mind you
 
  #5  
Old 05-28-14, 02:20 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,367
Received 2,323 Upvotes on 2,066 Posts
Cheap angle grinders can be $30 while a half way decent one is only about $60. That and a few wheels will make quick work of the protruding anchors. When you're done you can use the grinder to sharpen mower blades, grind down sidewalk cracks to reduce trip hazards. They even have wire wheels for stripping paint and chain saw discs for wood carving.
 
  #6  
Old 05-28-14, 06:28 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Not going to work!

Hey guys, no joy. I have ten inch diameter footings meaning I do not have enough room to offset the post anchors. So the drill and fill approach is out. I am considering two other options. The first is splitting another footing tube, digging alongside the original footing, putting the half tube in place and filling it with new concrete thereby giving me more surface area to deal with. My concern with this option is that moisture would get in the new seam and freeze (Minnesota) and push the two footings apart. Option two is digging alongside the footing and trying to physically moving it into position as best I can.
Opinions?
 
  #7  
Old 05-29-14, 06:11 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 6,541
Received 15 Upvotes on 13 Posts
I would combo both of the ideas mentioned. Use the j bolt as is and off set it by drilling a new hole in the base stand off. I would also match that with a new drilled bolt on the opposite side of the footer to balance the weight hold evenly across the tube. Therefore your post would have 2 bolts holding it in place. Also, most support beams nowadays are notched and through bolted to any beam over head. Can you not just notch appropriately so that one is on one side of the beam and the other is on the opposite side of the beam? Don't have to be perfectly in a row to support the same beam.
 
  #8  
Old 05-29-14, 01:40 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Another idea

Any thoughts on this option?
What if I were to buy a larger diameter concrete form tube say 14” for example and place that one over the existing 10” footing? So that I would have two concentric footings, that way I would still have a round footing versus a round footing with a “bubble” on one side of it – from the half form joined to the existing footing method I mentioned in my earlier (8:28 PM) post.
Then I would have enough room to drill a new hole and place the threaded rod.


I hate to be a pest, but after 2 ˝ years of Chemo and Radiation, my wife gets what she wants and she wants a new deck so any and all help is appreciated!
 
  #9  
Old 05-29-14, 09:52 PM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2,838
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
I would not go with adding any more concrete in an effort to make the beam supports line up. In your climate, the vertical bond-line between individual placements will rapidly diminish when freeze-thaw cycles do their thing, with the result being concrete splitting and separating. Then you'd have a larger headache, dismantling part of the deck to make major corrections.

I also would not cut off any existing J-bolts. They really function best when allowed to remain in place, as cast. A much simpler solution, and just as effective, would be to first install your columns on the stand-off brackets in place. Then use a taut stringline to determine the exact amount of offset that exists at each column, holding and wrapping it at the two interior (equal offset) "keeper" columns. Then it's time to combine using both offset column notches (as mentioned previously) with constructing a few timber corbels (acting as ledges) on the columns that need them, to enable lining things up in a straight line. I'm guessing that 4 x 4s attached perpendicular to the vertical columns would provide enough width to accomplish the offsets that you need. Use through-bolts to attach the corbels to the columns, run them longer than the column widths, and hide the corbels from view, if necessary, with a lower, false rim board.
 
  #10  
Old 05-30-14, 09:00 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bridgeman,

The freeze thaw damage potential concerns me a lot, my concrete guy seems pretty inclined to go that route. I am getting to the point of digging and pushing.
I have attached an image of the current situation that is to scale in the Y-axis.
Assuming a beam on either side of the post, it would look like the attached jpeg image.
The blue circles are 10“ diameter footings, I superimposed 6 x 6 posts, and 1 ˝” beams on either side of the posts to show all the offsets.
If I understand you correctly, then based on how far off the posts currently are, I think I am too far off to add ledges at least not that I would trust with any weight.
The scale is Ľ: 1
 
Attached Images  
  #11  
Old 05-31-14, 11:05 AM
BridgeMan45's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2,838
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
"Digging and pushing" is likely to be a frustrating experience, with very questionable results if done. I've never heard of anyone trying to slide a 400-lb. wad of concrete, in a hole, while still maintaining perfect plumb and sound bearing with the soil underneath. There's nothing strong enough to apply lateral force against except uncompacted soil. Even trying to move that large a mass located at grade level (instead of in a hole) would be difficult.

Here's a thought: why not bring the (amateur) concrete guy who installed the footings incorrectly back into the picture, and have him remove and replace the 3 that are out of whack? At his expense, of course, and with you there to check his work. Fixing his screw-ups shouldn't be your problem. And when he's there, you could show him how easy it is to use a stringline and batter boards to ensure things are built in correct locations.

You didn't mention what the footings are spaced at, but using a single 2 x 8 as a joist-supporting beam isn't a good idea. Doubling or tripling them up would result in a far stronger deck structure.
 
  #12  
Old 06-03-14, 11:49 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 8
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Update

Last summer I did manually pull three buried footings from the area that ran about 350 pounds. I dug around them first to free them up and then I wrapped a chain around the head, used a 4 x 4 and some cement blocks and levered them up to the point I could grab the foot and swing them out. Doable, yes. Doing again, NO! Good news tho, ran into an old buddy who happens to have a skid loader. So we will be pulling out my worst ones and staring all over. Couldn't be happier because now it will be done right and wife will have her deck soon!
Thanks for all the input guys. It is truly appreciated.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: