Rotten deck beams

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  #1  
Old 09-21-14, 10:33 AM
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Rotten deck beams

This deck belongs to a wooden house in a mountain. Unfortunately it was left wihout proper care for so long and the heavy rain and snow took their toll on the wooden deck and especially on the big heavy beams that support it. A big portion of the deck is under the roof so the rain can't reach it, but the rest got rotten after all those years of exposure.

Unfortunately those big wooden beams are coming out of the house so it will be very difficult to replace. But maybe I can repair the damage that has be done so far?

Please if you know about wooden decks and beams give me your lights.

Take a look at the pics
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Last edited by DarkAlleyMan; 09-21-14 at 12:01 PM.
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Old 09-21-14, 11:04 AM
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Not sure where you are located. Your Profile is a little unreadable. Cantilevered decks are a problem to begin with. You can't attach a ledger to the brick, but cutting the cantilevers off flush to the brick will give you a place to bolt up a ledger. From there you will need to plan on post and beam for the outer perimeter of the deck,joists, hangers, etc.
 
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Old 09-21-14, 01:27 PM
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Looks like it was also built to high and is to close to the siding and the door openings.
Single story?
If it is tear it down, cut off those old joist even with the side of the house, add siding all the way down to just below the foundation.
Then build a free standing deck.
 
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Old 09-22-14, 04:39 AM
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It seems like I 'll have to build it all over again.

The deck is actually quite far out from the siding (the perspective of the pic is confusing) and that's the problem, because the roof can't protect the outer part of it.

The thing is these beams are not completely rotten, most of them are quite healthy.

The house is located in Greece bytheway. On a mountain 1300m above the sea level.
 
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Old 09-22-14, 08:41 PM
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Good construction timber is scarce in your part of the world, so let's take a closer look. If just the upper portions of the beams are rotted (the visible lower halves in the pix appear reasonably sound), and located far enough away from the building wall such that the maximum cantilever bending moment capacity at the egress point isn't completely compromised, the engineer in me would try to retrofit a corrective plan instead of junking everything and starting over. Something along the lines of timber flitch plates, glued-and-screwed to replacement web members, combined with a new full-depth sistered member on each beam. You should consider having a qualified local engineer look at it, to see if he/she could make it right.
 
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Old 09-24-14, 03:33 AM
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Thanks for your answer. Timber flitch plates sounds like a good idea! Scraping off the rotten parts of the beam and reinforce it with metal and healthy pieces of wood.
 
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