Building deck planters - bottom

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-23-14, 03:41 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 323
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Building deck planters - bottom

I want to build large deck planters on an existing cedar deck. Due to homeowner's rules, they cannot be attached to the deck. I want to build 3 boxes and they would be around 6' long x 30" tall x 20" deep. I was going to use dimensional lumber (2x8s), at least for the fronts/sides as I have it.

My dilemma is do I build a frame and line it with plastic/landscape fabric using the deck as the bottom? I am afraid of deck rot, even with the lining.

On the other hand, to build some kind of bottom that sits above the deck and is strong enough to support all the dirt and shrubs might be difficult (it is a roof deck so weight is a consideration).
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-23-14, 06:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Louisville KY
Posts: 578
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
What are you planning on planting in the planters? Would it be possible to build something like a 20"x 20"x 72" box and set that on top of short legs? That would allow sufficient ventilation as well as helping to reduce the weight.
 
  #3  
Old 10-23-14, 07:06 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 3 Votes on 3 Posts
Water has to go somewhere, and you can't trap it in your planter. Got plans for that?
 
  #4  
Old 10-23-14, 09:02 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 323
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Water has to go somewhere, and you can't trap it in your planter. Got plans for that?
If I used the deck as the bottom, I would put drainage holes in the liner at the bottom. The deck already has gaps between the boards, or I could make the holes go through the deck boards too.

I would probably put a drainage hole every 18 inches.
 
  #5  
Old 10-24-14, 05:21 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,514
Received 168 Votes on 149 Posts
I think you are making a mistake using the deck for the bottom of the planter as it will rot the deck sooner or later. If the planter has it's own bottom, slightly elevated from the deck [the width of a 2x might be enough] it will have a better chance of drying out when it gets wet and when the planter bottom dies, you can replace/dispose of it rather than that portion of the deck.
 
  #6  
Old 10-24-14, 06:19 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 323
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I think you are making a mistake using the deck for the bottom of the planter as it will rot the deck sooner or later. If the planter has it's own bottom, slightly elevated from the deck [the width of a 2x might be enough] it will have a better chance of drying out when it gets wet and when the planter bottom dies, you can replace/dispose of it rather than that portion of the deck.
If I use 3/4 pt plywood for the bottom, what kind of support would I need to hold that up along with 2 feet of dirt and shrubs?
 
  #7  
Old 10-24-14, 06:57 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,514
Received 168 Votes on 149 Posts
You want air flow under the planter to help dry out the underside of the planter. IMO a couple of 2x4 runners would be sufficient.
 
  #8  
Old 10-24-14, 07:05 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
A guy I know bought all of his plastic planters first, various sizes, some the size typically used under windows and others for large plants, then built his wood boxes to accommodate these liners. The bottoms of the boxes are slatted so that the liners can drain without soaking the wood, and, for the ones that mattered as far as keeping water from ruining the deck, he fabricated some custom shallow drain troughs and attached them to the bottom of the boxes to direct the water past the edge of the deck. Can't remember what he said he used for the troughs, but imagine something like metal valley material or coil stock would work.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: