Replacing Railing - 'Beveled' or 'Planed' Edge Question

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Old 06-09-15, 12:06 AM
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Replacing Railing - 'Beveled' or 'Planed' Edge Question

My deck was put together with nails, not deck screws.

Some of the 2x6's that make up the railing on my roof deck have warped with enough strength that they've pulled up the nails and have made quite a mess.

I'd like to yank 'em out and replace 'em.

The short edge is less than 16' wide, so it's all one board; the long edge is about 40', so there's three boards. Where the first and third board each meet with the middle one, the edges have been planed to 45 degrees:
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I presume this is necessary/best practice, to help maintain some aesthetic integrity as wood swells with the weather?

So two questions:
1) Is this indeed necessary?
2) I don't own a table saw - so will my local lumber yard/Home Depot cut the edge like that for me?
2a) What is that edge called?

Thanks,
 
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Old 06-09-15, 03:11 AM
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What you have is a beveled joint. It is best in your situation as it allows screws to penetrate both pieces of wood at one time. Yours have aged quite a bit and would need replacing. I would bevel them just as you have now. Putting them up with butt joints will show separation more quickly and more pronounce. Of course we are only looking at two posts rather than the entire balustrade, so the information is limited.
 
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Old 06-09-15, 04:37 PM
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OK, thanks. Notice that the guy who put it in didn't do a real good job making sure it went through both.

When I buy the lumber at Home Depot, can I ask them to bevel for me? Or do I need to rent a table saw?

Us city folk don't have much use for a ton of power tools...
 
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Old 06-10-15, 03:54 AM
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I've always considered a bevel as an edge cut off of the sides to eliminate the sharp 90 on the sides.
How do you plan to cut the lumber? The 45 miter is normally cut with either a miter saw or skil saw. You wouldn't use a table saw.
 
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Old 06-10-15, 05:06 AM
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I would consider a cut across the grain at an angle with the board flat a miter, and a cut skewed like the OP's as a bevel, but what's in a name? I would rent a compound miter saw, not a table saw for the job.
 
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Old 06-10-15, 08:49 AM
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Measure twice, cut once. And for anyone not familiar with a power saw's operation, it's extremely important to always respect the blade. You want to finish the job with the same number of fingers that you started it with.
 
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Old 06-10-15, 09:20 PM
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So, to interpret everyone's answers to my question...

"Will the lumberyard do that for me?" It looks like the answer is "No."
 
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Old 06-10-15, 10:48 PM
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A few calls to your local lumberyards should answer that question for you.

I've never seen any lumberyard performing bevel cuts. Many big box stores used to do simple cross-cuts on dimensional lumber, for a fee (50 cents per cut where I'd seen it done), but even those are becoming rarer than a good steak. Probably too many missing finger claims filed by (former) employees.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 04:09 AM
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Another factor is, what if they don't cut it accurately? Much better to have a saw on hand that will perform the task at hand (no pun intended). Be careful.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 04:16 AM
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Also if you precut all the lumber - what if you made a 1/4" mistake in the measuring
Better to measure, cut, install and then measure the next piece.
 
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