Slope of Paver Patio

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-25-15, 03:05 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Slope of Paver Patio

I will be installing a paver patio, adding onto and replacing a preexisting patio. I live in a cul-de-sac where the yards behind me gently slope into my backyard, so if I were to slope the patio away from my house I'm worried I would create a swamp at the end of the patio. Would it be recommended to slope toward the side of the house, where the ground already naturally slopes down and away from the house? Is there another solution? I'm not sure how that will look sloping it toward the side of the house, as it might be more noticeable with a level retaining wall for the garden against the house.

I've included a picture of the area to give a better idea, though you can't see the slope toward the house. It's nothing drastic and we don't usually flood, except for some random low points.
 
Attached Images  
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-25-15, 04:58 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,616
Received 318 Votes on 292 Posts
ALWAYS SLOPE AWAY FROM YOUR HOUSE!!! Water must go somewhere and the further away from your house the better especially since you have a split level. The last thing you want is to direct water near the lower level.

Over your lot in general, what's the topography like? You mention the neighbors yards sloping down to yours but where does the water go from there? Any chance you can build the patio sloping away from your house then re-grade the yard to direct the water somewhere?
 
  #3  
Old 06-25-15, 05:52 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 2,079
Received 65 Votes on 60 Posts
I definitely agree that you need to direct the water away from the house. It looks like your a/c unit is already leaning back toward the house; possibly sloppy workmanship, but just as likely settling around the house, which can be exacerbated by poor grading. My suggestion is to rent a laser level at the local independent rental shop or big box, and make a layout of the elevations, inclusive and exclusive of the proposed patio. Make sure to set some stakes, so that you retain a benchmark. You may find that you can leave the existing area as is, or you may find that you need to remove it, which is less than ideal, but better now than later. As long as you can maintain an even slope, something in the vicinity of 1/8" per foot is pretty decent, in that water will flow downhill, but it's still feels fairly level to most people.
 
  #4  
Old 06-25-15, 07:52 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I appreciate the replies, but I wasn't disputing that the patio should slope away from the house. My question was more about whether it has to be straight back from the house or if it could slope to the side.

Regrading the entire yard is not a project that I am looking to take on, in addition to the sizeable patio. Overall, drainage is fairly decent. There are some low spots, but mostly the only time the yard is swampy is in the spring, after the thaw and before the grass has come back. I just don't want to slope straight back and potentially create a problem, when sloping to the side might be the better option.

The air conditioner is tilted, but only because it sits on some uneven river rock that we never removed when we put in the garden.

Regarding the drainage in general, it's never flowing like a river, so it's hard to say. But that side with the fence definitely drains down toward the fence and into my neighbors yard. The sides of the house drain toward the front.

Are patios like this ever sloped toward the side, or would that look strange? I will be replacing the cobblestones from that garden along the back of the house with a brick retaining wall that will be the border for that side of the new patio. That's the only reason I worry it might look off, as the retaining wall will most likely have to be level, right? Or would I be able to slope that to compensate for the pitch of the patio, if I go in that direction?
 
  #5  
Old 06-26-15, 07:58 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 21,616
Received 318 Votes on 292 Posts
Nothing says the paver patio has to be flat in just one plane. You can have the section next to the house sloping straight back and away to get the water away from the house. Then then outer portion can have a slope in whatever direction needed to move the water. Since the slope is quite shallow most people will never notice that it's sloping in more than one direction.
 
  #6  
Old 06-26-15, 09:29 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Would I be able to slope the retaining wall as well, at a rate of 1" per 8', or should that be level?

The only problem with sloping the portion next to the house (the current patio in the picture) is that there is a concrete slab right outside the back door. If I slope it to the side, I'm not sure how it would look with the slab.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: