Deck over concrete patio

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Old 08-15-15, 08:34 PM
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Deck over concrete patio

Hey all, first post!

I am thinking about doing something like this:
How to Build a Deck Over a Concrete Patio | The Family Handyman

Before I even think about starting it my main concern is my back patio is all cracked and the main crack down the middle of the slab has half of it level and the other half sloping towards my house.

Not only would the deck slope if I built over top of the concrete but I also worry about rain and the water running towards my foundation and causing me more problems.

Do I need to remove all of that concrete or what's my best next steps?

Thanks in advance!

Chris
 
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Old 08-15-15, 08:38 PM
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Chris, welcome to the forums! Think about the deck breathing underneath. If you stop the air movement, algae, mold, etc will take over. This is in addition to the problems you mentioned. If the patio is in that bad a shape,I would demo it and either replace it with new concrete, or demo and build a free standing low deck with air under it.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:24 AM
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thanks for the reply!

that makes sense but I find it weird that FHM would post somethign like that online and in print if it could cause algae, mold and other problems. They are trying to steer this noobie in the wrong direction!
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:25 AM
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Post a picture so we can see what issues may come into play.
No close ups needed!
I'm mainly interested in how high above grade the deck would need to be.
Main concern is no deck, stoop, patio should ever be built within a bare minimum of 2" of any door openings.
Can not think of a single good reason to leave an old failing patio in place.
If the old patio failed most often it just was not prep correctly, and or there was no expantion gap where it meets the foundation, lack of cuts or just done poorly.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:30 AM
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Happens all the time, on those silly DIY shows, Youtube.
 
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Old 08-16-15, 06:36 AM
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pics would be nice - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
Without a pic we'd at least need to know what the distance is between the slab and the house floor along with how high the slab is off of the ground [or if it's level with]
 
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Old 09-05-15, 03:13 PM
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pics

Sorry for the delay on the pics but maybe this will give you a better idea...

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Old 09-05-15, 03:41 PM
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There is enough height where you could leave the patio but wherever the legs go you need to remove the concrete, dig down to the frost line and pour a footer.
 
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Old 09-05-15, 06:19 PM
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is it ok to leave the concrete though? If it's sloping towards the house, when it rains and goes through the deck, the water will still run towards the foundation right?

What's best to prevent that?
 
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Old 09-06-15, 04:18 AM
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If it slopes toward the house - I'd remove the slab.
 
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Old 09-29-15, 10:36 AM
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This is one topic this forum never seems to get right. The FHM article works wonderfully; I did it myself (and posted about it on this forum). A couple of notes:

- You do not need to, nor do you want to, pour footers or dig below the frost line. This is a floating deck.

- You do need to, however, fix your existing slab by applying a topping mix (exactly as described in the article). This will make the deck build easier, and also make sure water is correctly channeled away from your house.

- One area where I differed: I tapered my sleepers to take some of the slope out of the deck. Patios are usually sloped much more aggressively than decks. Note: this was kind of a pain, and I might skip this step in the future just to make the build quicker.

- Sleeper installations are common in a variety of circumstances (think over a roof), and composite decking manufacturers allow for them provided you leave at least 1.5" of clearance below. It's in the install directions for both Trex and Timbertech.

- For a lasting install, you really need to get ground-treated lumber, which can be special ordered for a nominal cost from your local lumber yard (I paid $.50 extra per 2x4)

- Lastly, you'll be going through a lot of tapcons and shims, as your sleepers should be shimmed every 12" or so. If drilling in 50 year old concrete (like I was), you'll likely need a rotary drill to drill all those holes.
 
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