Repainting wooden fence on my porch

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Old 08-25-15, 01:35 PM
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Repainting wooden fence on my porch

I have a couple bird feeders hanging directly above the railing/fence on my porch and they have destroyed it! It is certainly time for a repaint and possible repair. Here are my questions:

1 - It appears the previous paint was a flat paint. However, where the fence/railing is under the suet cake, the suet has dropped down on it and has caused it to be slippery/glossy with the suet rubbed in. What do I have to do special to that area so that the new paint will stick/abosorb.

2 - As you can see from the picture, there are some areas that wood is missing it is so worn (small areas). What kind of fill in can I use? Is there some sort of wood filler?

3 - What type of paint is best? And glossy or flat? Keeping in mind it looks like flat was used last time it appears. It seems like Glossy would be easier to clean but it is harder to paint with, right?

4 - we were thinking about putting something on top of the top railing to protect it when we are done. What would work? Such as a piece of plastic cut to size? any suggestions?

5 - we were also thinking that maybe just putting a thinner piece of wood over the top of the railing would be a better way to go about this. Would that look tacky?

6- well, any other suggestions, comments to make the job work is much appreciated!

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Old 08-25-15, 03:14 PM
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No way would I have painted pressure tread wood or used a flat sheen.
Sure it's not solid stain?
A simple way to take care of that top rail is to use composite decking boards right on top of what's there now.
Use constrution adhesive and ceramic coated decking screws in pilot drilled holes from under the railing.
What fence, that's a railing.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:17 PM
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I'd replace the wood (at least the piece you showed with the damage) and use a solid body stain on it if you used actual wood. If you follow Joe's advice and use composite, no stain necessary.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:21 PM
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Replace that board and your going to have to wait months for it to dry out before doing anything.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:23 PM
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Hard to tell from the pic if it's flat paint or solid stain but I agree with replacing the bad wood and then coating it with a solid stain. You need to clean that portion of the railing as needed and/or restain it occasionally.

If for some reason you can't/won't replace the damaged wood you can use a wood filler, sand it level and coat it with an oil base primer then top coat with a latex solid stain [might take 2 coats of stain]
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:28 PM
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Replace that board and your going to have to wait months for it to dry out before doing anything.
Good point from Joe - I don't use PT wood in a visible location like this so I assumed cedar or the equivalent but yes, the wood needs to be dry before it can be stained regardless of what kind of wood it is.
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:42 PM
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thanks everyone - great advice. If it is stain does that mean I can not paint over it? Or is stain the best way to go? Any stain or paint brands recommended?
 
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Old 08-25-15, 03:52 PM
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Solid stain is somewhat like a thin paint. You can paint over solid stain. While solid stain can be applied over paint, that is only recommended when there are just small areas of paint you plan to apply the solid stain over.

Usually you'll find better coatings [including stain] at your local paint store rather than at a big box paint dept. Most of us are partial to Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore although there are many other brands that have quality coatings.
 
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Old 09-21-15, 11:29 AM
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project completed!

Someone suggested I go to Sherwin Williams for paint and guidance and that was a great suggestion. They looked at a chunk of wood that came out and said it was paint, not stain. They sold me a wonderful paint that covered beautifully and advised me as to the prep work (tsp and scuffing). Looks beautiful. Thanks for all your suggestions!
 
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