Deck support

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Old 10-11-15, 09:45 AM
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Deck support

When building a low freestanding deck on piers is it a good idea after the frame is on piers to attatch a few areas of the outside frame, with some blocking in the open space , to the concrete foundation block , for extra strength to help keep it from pulling away ?
Also, if recommended - is it a must to go fully through the entire hollow block or can i go thru and attach thru center area? And how many ft apart for each?
Any info is appreciated.
 
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Old 10-11-15, 11:17 AM
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I'm not sure what you are talking about.

You're building a free standing deck and then are asking about attaching it to the house foundation ?
It wouldn't be free standing then.
 
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Old 10-11-15, 11:20 AM
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Also in some local communities it would then be an improvement and be subject to reassessment and a tax increase.
 
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Old 10-11-15, 09:11 PM
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im not talking about using this as a major main attatchment but just some extra hold in a few places- .to prevent any horizontal movement over the long period.maybe 3 or 4 for the 24 ft wide length
It is not a primary support by any means .

It specifies support can be used for stability in the IRC for the freestanding decks .
 

Last edited by trotter; 10-11-15 at 10:15 PM.
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Old 10-11-15, 10:36 PM
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That would probably be a good question to ask the building inspector or the sub code official as I'm sure it differs by area.
 
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Old 10-11-15, 11:02 PM
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I had trouble getting exact pic but its here and on page 19 figure 23 attaching freestanding deck to house for stability,

2009-Deck-Guide-.pdf

Name:  fig23.JPG
Views: 68
Size:  46.8 KB
 

Last edited by PJmax; 10-12-15 at 11:11 AM. Reason: corrected link/added diagram
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Old 10-12-15, 05:27 AM
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As Pete said each community has it's own rules. Years back when I contemplated adding a deck to the back of house the building inspector told me that if the deck touches the house or in any way is attached to house then it will be tax and considered an improvement. Don't know if it is still that way.
 
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Old 10-12-15, 07:16 AM
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I could not find a figure 23 on page 19 of the document you referred to.

Has your state adopted your referenced document as a part of the state code? Has the state made any changes/amendments to it? Has you county made any amendments beyond what the state accepts? - More local organizations (states, counties, municipalities) can make changes/additions to or change model code as long as they are more restrictive or clarify a model code. The document you referred may not be a legal enforceable document, but just a reference aid (may not be in "legal" language.

If it is attached to the home, you will be required to have all footings down to the local frost depth since a deck end may heave up permanently during the winter or damage your home in some way.

Best to ask a local code or official or inspector what is acceptable where you are getting a permit.

Dick
 
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Old 10-12-15, 09:15 AM
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2009-Deck Guide.pdf

Name:  fig23.JPG
Views: 42
Size:  46.8 KB


my local area had the same set up diagram as 2009 version --note the 2012 may look different

figure 23 page 19 of 37 titled-Attatchment of Freestanding Deck to House for Deck Stability.

-that one with email address is based on 2009 international Residential Code(Design for Code Acceptance)..Prescription Residential Wood Deck Construction Guide
 

Last edited by PJmax; 10-12-15 at 11:13 AM. Reason: corrected link/added diagram
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Old 10-12-15, 09:55 AM
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To my knowledge, no code will allow a once floating deck to be attached to a house. Once it is attached to the house, all other supports must be below the frost line. Not sure how they deal with it in the south though, if that still applies, but I would assume it would have to be dug down to hard pan.

When you say you have a floating deck, you do mean the supports are sitting on top of the groud, correct? Or are the supports that are there now already dug below frost?
 
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Old 10-12-15, 10:05 AM
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its GOING to be- a freestanding deck w piers far below frost line . and done as in the link i sent since local codes here say EXACT thing on the page i specified--if i could get pics to load here it would tell all.. but for some reason pics are not loading nor are the pdf links. nor the one for my local area - a word pad file.


that page 19 in BOLD States it Attatchement of Freestanding Decks to Home for Deck Stability

would be good if someone could set the link in from that 2009 IRC Guide..-its there
.
 
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Old 10-12-15, 10:19 AM
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Ok, your question in your first post is not very clear at all. The term "freestanding" deck is generally used to describe a deck that is not attached to anything else, but it sounds like you are asking if it should be attached to your foundation, and how far the fasteners should be attached. If that is the case, it is not a freestanding deck anymore.

From what I gather, you have no deck now, correct? This is going to be a low to the ground deck, will the finished height be over 2 feet?

If your only concern is about the deck pulling away from the house, then no, that is not a reason to attach it. Depending on the height of your deck, you will use diagnal brases from your posts to the deck to hold it from moving.

If you do want to attach it to the foundation, then you will not need any posts along the foundation wall at all, and will not need any braces depending on the height and size of your deck.
 
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Old 10-12-15, 12:50 PM
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Corrected links and added diagrams to both posts.
 
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Old 10-12-15, 01:09 PM
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Here is the updated code based on 2012. The wording and requirements you seek have changed.

http://www.awc.org/pdf/codes-standar...Guide-1405.pdf

If you are building a low free standing deck, I would not worry about stability issues. I have been on many free standing decks. Something low to the ground should not have any issues with sway once everything is bolted together and the deck boards are installed. Different story if the deck is 8 ft in the air.
 
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