Help with stabilizing a new free standing lean too


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Old 10-14-15, 10:17 AM
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Help with stabilizing a new free standing lean too

Hello,

I recently built this free standing cover over my grill and I thought i added enough to stabilize it but is still sways a bit much if you go up and lean on it. Any ideas?

I have had some suggestions of cross-cable with a turn buckles? but not sure where to put those or if there is something else to do.

I guess i wonder how much this type of structure should sway?
All of the horizontal beams are double 2x8's with treated plywood between them.

the posts are 4x6 and attached using strong ties to the concrete footers.

any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

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Old 10-14-15, 11:23 AM
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Braces

Add four more braces at the posts to complement the four braces already there.

 
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Old 10-14-15, 11:33 AM
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Are those 2 X 8's just sitting on top of those post?
Those horizontal 2 X's are not doing anything to strengthen it.
Those rafters look there was no birds mouth cut out and no hurricane ties, first strong wind and it's going to blow off.
Really should have been 6 X 6's notched and through bolted.
There's no diagnals on the sides.
How did you attach the ones that are there?
 
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Old 10-14-15, 11:58 AM
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Thanks for the questions

The 2 x 8's sit on top of a notched 4x6 and are bolted through.

The 2x6's in the rafters have hurricane straps just not shown in the pictures or the one below

The diagonals on the sides were attached with screws and liquid nails, guessing i should have used lag bolts?


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Are those 2 X 8's just sitting on top of those post?
Those horizontal 2 X's are not doing anything to strengthen it.
Those rafters look there was no birds mouth cut out and no hurricane ties, first strong wind and it's going to blow off.
Really should have been 6 X 6's notched and through bolted.
There's no diagnals on the sides.
How did you attach the ones that are there?
 
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Old 10-14-15, 01:10 PM
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I agree with Ken that you need additional diagonal bracing. The 2x's running front to back in a lateral movement should have been embedded the entire width of the 4x6 lumber, then bolted through as well. Of course 6x6 would have been better, but it is built. A full lap joint would help, along with the diagonal bracing.
 
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Old 10-14-15, 05:28 PM
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Screws are useless, should have been long lag 1/2" bolts.
 
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Old 10-15-15, 03:10 AM
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All of the horizontal beams are double 2x8's with treated plywood between them.
To what purpose is sandwiching plywood between the beams going to accomplish in your build? Plywood is sandwiched in traditional framing of headers to pack out the beam so that the dimensions equal that of traditional 2x material.

I agree with others in that additional bolted diagonal bracing is needed. It also sways as a factor of the simspson ties you have on your concrete footers. There is not enough meat to grab at the base of the 4x6 to really perform any stabilization on something that extends out 8 feet from the fulcrum. I have had similar sway problems on porch railing systems which is why a 90 degree turn is usually included to provide some lateral strength.
 
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Old 10-15-15, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by czizzi
Plywood is sandwiched in traditional framing of headers to pack out the beam so that the dimensions equal that of traditional 2x material.
Spacer only? What about the strength and sag resistance provided by ply, adhesive and properly staggered nails?
 
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Old 10-15-15, 02:18 PM
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From "Carpentry & Building Construction" by Mark D. Feirer & John L Feirer published by McGraw Hill. It is also required reading to pass license requirements for the state of Virginia.

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Old 10-15-15, 10:45 PM
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If sway is the problem how about making some gussets out of say 5/8 plywood, not that chipboard I see there. Wouldn't be all that difficult and pretty easy to install.






Just on the front corners might be enough but all corners would be better.

Just a thought.
 
 

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