How to sand and stain these stairs?


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Old 11-13-15, 12:05 PM
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How to sand and stain these stairs?

Hello. We have this piece of wood under the back door that is rotting. Someone told us that we needed to sand and stain it. Replacement is not an option this season. Staining is the easy part. However, I've never sanded wood. What will it take? Is it even the best route to prepare it for staining? Thanks.



Here's of close-up of the same piece:



Here's a picture of the other piece. My guess is that we only have to stain this one.

 
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Old 11-13-15, 02:03 PM
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On the first one I'd scrape as needed and then sand with 80 grit. You mainly just want to smooth up the edges. It wouldn't hurt to do a light sanding on the one in the bottom pic just so the stain will take better. What type of stain do you intend to use?
 
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Old 11-13-15, 02:18 PM
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Back up so we can see the whole thing.
I'm seeing a bunch of issues.
T-111 siding right up against a slab.
A door with no threshold.
An old rotted threshold that should be replaced.
A piece of soft shelving board used as a threshold.
A huge gap where leaves, dirt and water have to be rotting out any wood below it.
 
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Old 11-13-15, 04:37 PM
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Do you recommend sanding and staining these wood pieces? One is clearly rotted?
 
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Old 11-13-15, 04:40 PM
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The stain is standard, water-resistant deck stain that would would get at a big box hardware store.

Does "80 grit" refer to the type of paper? Do I do this by pushing sandpaper back and forth?

Although I appreciate the help, I could really use more specificity because I am new to doing odd jobs around the house.

Thanks.
 
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Old 11-14-15, 03:50 AM
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Deck stain should be ok although an oil base primer followed by porch and deck enamel would offer more protection [not that it would help the bad stoop much]

Sandpaper comes in different grits, the lower the number the rougher the sandpaper is. 120 grit is ideal for the threshold that is in good shape but would be too slow for the rough stoop although scraping off the loose is the main thing.

Not sure how to do a good job of describing how to sand but basically you rub the paper back and forth across the substrate to be sanded. Generally it's best to sand with the direction of the stain so any sanding scratches are hid. There is probably a u-tube video out there showing someone sanding.
 
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Old 11-14-15, 05:59 AM
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It would take days to sand off all that old paint and try and smooth out that old threshold by hand.
Go buy a random orbital sander.
 
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Old 11-14-15, 09:07 AM
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IMO the older threshold isn't worth the effort to try and sand it smooth and new looking. It needs to be replaced but scraping it and applying a coat or two of paint/stain will stop/slow down the deterioration and give you some more time.
 
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Old 11-14-15, 03:35 PM
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Is scraping the same as sanding? If not, do I have to do one, the other, or both? If I have to "scrape," how do you do that?

Also, if they are different things, maybe I could apply 50/50 bleach/water solution and brush the step as opposed to scraping it. That will remove the dirt and some of the paint.
 
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Old 11-15-15, 04:33 AM
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It never hurts to clean a substrate before painting but you need to make sure you rinse off all the cleaner residue!

You can scrape with either a putty knife or pull scraper [I normally use both] the objective is to remove any loose paint. Scraping is the quickest way to remove loose paint. Sanding will soften the edges between the raw wood and the remaining paint making it look nicer. Scraping or other wise removing loose paint is mandatory, sanding is not.
 
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Old 11-16-15, 08:58 AM
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Thanks everyone for the tips. I should be good from here.
 
 

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