18% slope on property won't allow for second structure.

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Old 11-20-15, 09:17 PM
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18% slope on property won't allow for second structure.

Hi All,

Our property has an 18% slope. We saw the original plans from the 50's that are filed with the city. We have plenty of space to build a second structure if our land was flat, but due to the 18% slope, we need 1 1/2 times the minimum to build another residence.
My question is....is it possible that the 18 % slope recorded with the city on the original plans may have been before the original house was built, therefore before the land was graded? And if so, is it possible that our slope has changed? The city states that if it has already been graded to just use those contours to determine slope instead of the natural contours, so if it is different, that may help us.
Hope that makes sense.
Thanks for all advice.
 
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Old 11-20-15, 11:37 PM
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Welcome to the best DIY forum on the Internet. Unfortunately, I doubt that anyone here can address your problem as it is most likely a land-use issue controlled on a LOCAL basis by the city or county where the house exists.

More likely as not you will have to engage the services of a soils engineer or a civil engineer to determine the slope of your lot and how it conforms (or doesn't conform) to the land-use laws in the area. The engineer will also know the methods that can be used to mitigate any problems in design for additional building on the lot. Any information that you might get via the Internet will be worth every penny you pay for it. ONLY a licensed professional can give you the information you need to satisfy the governmental agencies.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 01:25 AM
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Thanks Furd for the reply.

Yes, we would definitely consult a professional and pay for it.

My question isn't about land use laws.

Just wondering if it's possible to change the slope to less than 10%, since it was recorded back in the '50's at 18%, possibly before the presentstructure was built.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 04:01 AM
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A dozer can change the slope
Not sure what the slope of the land has to do with erecting a structure other than more work to make the 1st floor level. Will it be a concrete slab? Furd pointed you in the right direction.
 
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Old 11-21-15, 05:17 AM
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I'm sure that the original Permit was issued with the intention of minimizing the amount of run-off and insuring that water from your land doesn't inundate any of the neighbors . . . . or overwhelm any storm sewer.

How congested is the neighborhood; you didn't mention the size of your parcel ?

And besides for the proposed new building, how much more of the lot will be paved and rendered impermeable ?

Your decision to consult a professional is a wise one !
 
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Old 11-21-15, 05:43 AM
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The difference between 18% and 10% is quite a bit.
As said, you need to consult a pro but since this is a DIY forum you should be able to do a rough estimate of the approximate slope of your property.

This info makes it easy.


% grade to degrees

 
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Old 11-22-15, 09:24 AM
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It must be one of those silly California regulations regarding the maximum slope of a property that you can build a house on. I've never heard of anything like it anyplace else. Building a house or other structure on sloped land is obviously more difficult but certainly not impossible!

In regards to your question about could the slope have been changed during the original construction, it certainly possible but probably not likely that it would change from 18% to 10%! A quick survey can tell you for sure.
 
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Old 11-22-15, 09:57 AM
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Wouldn't be many houses in my neck of the woods if they were only built on level ground
 
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