Need Help Building a Patio Cover

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Old 02-01-16, 11:14 PM
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Need Help Building a Patio Cover

I want to build a simple patio cover for my backyard. It has to be approved by the HOA so I am sure I will need a permit to build it. If a permit was no required I would just do it the easy way and have it supported by 4 post. I have been told by some the correct way to do this is to open stucco and join it to the frame of the second floor. Others have told me that it would be a bad idea to open the stucco because moisture could get it. They suggest drilling studs through the stucco with silicone around the washers. I think I can do the construction myself. What I am worried about is the placement and attaching the right part to the house. I received a few quotes that range from 5000-8000. Which is crazy for a 12x12 patio cover. I can probably do this for less than 2000 with all materials included. I am attaching some picture of the house as well as the patio cover I would like to build. Tell me what you guys think.

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Old 02-02-16, 01:38 AM
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Here in NY. footings would be required. You couldn't pass inspection with the posts, on top of the slab. I don't like the idea of drilling into the house either. Have you considered a canvas patio cover kit?
 
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Old 02-02-16, 05:23 AM
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I agree with Pulpo on this one.
Fastest, easiest, cost effective, may not even need a permit, no up lift issues in a storm. (as long as it was rolled up)
The only right way to attach a stick built roof would be to cut the stucco and flash.
https://www.google.com/search?q=roof...wTgwVVhjtyM%3A
 
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Old 02-02-16, 05:29 AM
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If you go with a permanent roof I don't see anyway not to cut into the stucco to install flashing. The stucco would likely need to be repaired [not a big deal] after the flashing is installed. As mentioned above you'd also need to cut out part of the slab to install footers .... or extend the patio.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 03:39 AM
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Well, couldn't I anchor the post to the slab? Worse case scenario I could just do the footers right passed the patio without extending it. I wish I could just put up a non permanent covering, but the HOA here is strict. They require ALL roofing on the property to match the roofing of the house. They don't allow anything other than permanent structures for the patio. I was hoping to build a patio cover in the back and a covering in the front of the house. I had no idea it was such a complicated process attaching the roof to the frame of the house. I have built an outdoor shed before and I thought it would have been a similar process. Now I am thinking this isn't something I would be able to do myself. With that being said, I might have to do without a patio cover. There is no way I am paying 8k for a small patio cover. What do you guys think the average 12x12 patio cover would cost?
 
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Old 02-03-16, 04:35 AM
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couldn't I anchor the post to the slab?
No, the only time that is allowed is when the slab was poured thicker at those areas so it would meet both the thickness and frost line requirements.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 07:02 AM
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They suggest drilling studs through the stucco with silicone around the washers. I think I can do the construction myself
Flashing aside, which is important. With a permit, the inspector and the plans would most likely not let you attach a ledger board to the house through the stucco, it's not a solid connection. The ledger board would need to be directly attached to the house framing.

If you can build this, I would just get help with installing the ledger. Just ask around and you'll probably find someone that will help you with this critical part and turn the rest over to you.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 01:56 PM
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I'm building a patio right now without the hassle of hoa or inspection. I still am overbuilding and exceeding code. I poured footings for my posts just outside the existing slab. The attachment to the house, for me, is on the slope of the existing roof. For you... I would chalk line where your ledger board is going, cut out the stucco, tuck flashing underneath (might have to be inventive to secure), lag bolt ledger board, then bang out the rest. I'm no pro, just my thoughts. Ultimately it's going to come down to what your inspector will let fly.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 02:07 PM
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Worse case scenario I could just do the footers right passed the patio without extending it.
That would be the easiest way but the local building codes have the last say.
 
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Old 02-03-16, 02:39 PM
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Ultimately it's going to come down to what your inspector will let fly.
TM is becoming an old pro at this If you bolt the ledger directly to the framing and flash/waterproof it, you'll be good.

It doesn't matter (or shouldn't matter to the inspector) if the footings are surrounded by a slab or not, they just need to be the proper size.
To be on the safe side, The top of the footings should be at least 6" above grade and standoff post bases should be used.
 

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Old 02-06-16, 12:36 AM
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Why are so many people recommending I break through the stucco and attach it directly to the frame of the house?

Some say that by doing so I will expose the interior of the stucco to moisture? Doesn't moisture condensate through there anyways?

My question is what are the benefits and disadvantages of doing it either way?
 
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Old 02-06-16, 04:05 AM
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Attaching it directly to the framing is more secure than trying to go thru the stucco plus the flashing needs to start under the flashing. The odds are the stucco will need to be patched once the work the is done after which nothing behind the stucco will be exposed to moisture.
 
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Old 02-06-16, 06:32 AM
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what are the benefits and disadvantages of doing it either way?
Are you getting a permit? That's the only thing that matters.
There are no benefits to attaching the ledger board through the stucco and I highly doubt the city engineers and the inspector will let you attach it that way.

If Florida is anything like here, the permit process won't require a ton of drawings (for a patio cover). The city engineers will want to see detailed drawings of the ledger to house connections, footing details along with post connections to footings. All of the drawings should be pretty easy to prepare and will not require a professional.

I had no idea it was such a complicated process attaching the roof to the frame of the house
It's not complicated. Use a diamond grit circular saw and set the depth shallower than the stucco so you leave any flashing and building paper intact, then chip out the stucco.
If you can cut a straight line, little or no patching will be required. You should be able to tuck the flashing up under the stucco.

***Here's why I think the engineers will not allow bolting through stucco:

If you bolt directly to the framing, the 1-1/2" ledger is very strongly "clamped" to the house.
Going through stucco, The 1-1/2" board is not "clamped" to the house, the bolts are separated from the house framing by maybe 1" or more of stucco.
So that 1" or more area of each bolt is unsupported by any structural material, the stucco can crumble.
The bolts could shear off. It's hard to imagine a bolt shearing, but it's possible. There have been cases, the most famous to me was in Chicago and I seem to remember dozens of people were killed. That was a deck that collapsed and although you're not building a deck, the connection must be the same as if it were a deck.
 
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Old 02-06-16, 06:58 AM
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Here are basic requirements for a patio cover. Each detail the engineers want to see are pointed out. There are plenty of people here that can help with the details and the best connectors to use. This drawing is a flyer handed out by a city here in Cal and is meant to make it as easy as possible to obtain a permit.

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Old 02-06-16, 06:16 PM
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I think it's a mistake to open up a sloped roof to facilitate a patio roof attachment, unless one lives where it NEVER rains. Even though the attachment is meticulous and overbuilt, eventually roof runoff water will work its way under the roof covering at the attachment points, having the potential to cause all kinds of problems. Then it will be time for some serious effort and money to repair/correct the damage to the roof structure and possibly exterior walls.

A far better way would be to cantilever the sloped patio roof over the house's sloped roof, but not attached to it. That way, runoff can flow down through the open gap and be collected by the gutters (hopefully) already in place.
 
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Old 02-11-16, 11:41 PM
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A lot of newer stucco homes have foam lathe and then chicken wire under the stucco. Even a good stucco job is going to crack under the pressure of the ledger board, probably during installation, if not... soon after. After the foam gives, the wall won't be carrying the load. A lag screw (or whatever you might use to attach ledger) that isn't securely attached (meaning it is separated by an inch of foam that you can crush with your bare hands) would be carrying the load. I know I wouldn't want my friends and family under several hundred (or thousand) pounds being held up by a few screws. The issue with cutting through the stucco is opening up your wall to potential water damage. That's why flashing (and some 100 % silicone for bonus peace of mind, imo) should be used. You can pop a couple of chalk lines and cut it just like Handyone suggested.

The pros for attaching ledger over the stucco: it will take you less time to put up and probably less money and hassle. The con is having an unsafe patio cover that could potentially destroy lives and certainly damage the structure.

Sorry if it's bad news, but just want you to know the worst case scenario. Hope your build goes smooth! You're doing good asking these questions.
 
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