Outdoor wood for planter

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Old 03-04-16, 06:42 PM
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Outdoor wood for planter

Moderators: If you feel this should be in gardening, please feel free to move it. I post it here since it is related to decking material. Thanks

I need to buy several 2x4 (about 10 feet long each) to frame a planter bed area. What type of wood or treatment should I buy or applied that will be somewhat weather proof?

I read on these sites:
The Best Woods for Decks and Porches
9 mighty woods for outdoor projects: Woods for outdoor projects

Redwood may be an option? Or should I just buy any type of wood and treated it with Thompson water sealer?
 
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Old 03-04-16, 08:49 PM
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Redwood is great but usually very expensive (may not be too bad since you are on west coast). Western red cedar is generally widely available at reasonable cost, and would be my first choice. Locust and white oak are also naturally water and rot resistant. Then you get into exotics like teak and Ipe....way overkill for a garden surround. Plain old SPF (spruce-pine-fir) won't last long outdoors, even with some sort of sealant on it.
 
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Old 03-04-16, 08:55 PM
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Thank you so much for your insight Paul! I will look into Cedar as you mentioned.
 
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Old 03-04-16, 09:01 PM
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One more thing, do I need to get it in treated version or buy any additional sealer? Or am I good to go once I put it into the ground?
 
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Old 03-05-16, 04:33 AM
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Redwood, cedar and cypress are naturally resistant to decay. PT wood is pine that has been treated with chemicals to help it fight off decay. If never heard of any wood other than pine being pressure treated.

Will the 2x4s be buried on both sides?
 
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Old 03-05-16, 09:25 AM
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Only one side will be buried and the other side will be exposed to the weather.

As for the wood that you have mentioned, what about termites and warping factors?

Also, the standard 2x4 sold by Home Depot and Lowe's, what type of wood are those? I think they are called Douglas Fir. If I remember correctly, these warped on me when put in sun light over time.
 
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Old 03-05-16, 09:50 AM
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Most wood will warp when it goes thru wetting/drying stages if it isn't secured somehow to prevent it. A 2x4 will warp before a 4x4 will which will warp easier than a 6x6. Most of our framing lumber is spruce but it could just be regional. All our PT wood is southern pine.
 
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Old 03-05-16, 11:19 AM
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Thank you for all the information Mark!
 
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Old 03-05-16, 12:19 PM
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Also, the standard 2x4 sold by Home Depot and Lowe's, what type of wood are those? I think they are called Douglas Fir.
Here in the west Hemlock is often used for framing lumber. It is an inferior wood in my opinion and it is often labeled as Hem-Fir because the load could have either Hemlock or Fir in the mix. Douglas Fir, not a true fir, is a superior wood but because it grows much slower than either Hemlock or the true Fir it is not re-planted as often and the end result is it has a premium price.
 
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Old 03-05-16, 01:07 PM
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Home Depot and Lowe's are about a mile from my house. Therefore, I usually purchase my lumbar from them. I appreciate the information on the Douglas Fir because HD's basic wood is:

2 in. x 4 in. x 10 ft. #2 & Btr Douglas Fir Lumber-603589 - The Home Depot

Would Douglas Fir be suitable for my project? Otherwise, I will stick with the recommendations made by CarbideTipped and MarkSR.
 
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