Deck built attached to house, but no frost footings

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Old 04-23-16, 01:45 PM
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Deck built attached to house, but no frost footings

So I had the bright idea to build a small 13x7 deck. I figured I would use deck blocks and built it as a floating deck. When we got to building it, the ground was pretty soft on the back side of the deck so we decided to use a ledger board instead of the blocks, but still use the blocks to support the rest of the deck. Now that it's all done I'm thinking it was a bad idea...if there is ground movement the deck will move with it, but it's anchored to the house and I'm not sure what damage will result. I'm more worried about damage to the concrete foundation than I am to the deck. I live in an area with maybe a week of below freezing weather a year so the ground never really freezes much (I'm assuming).

Any thoughts on what issues may arise, and how to modify the deck if necessary. I can't do proper frost footings because it's a strata complex and not allowed.
 
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Old 04-23-16, 01:51 PM
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You are right that the way you built it isnt kosher per se, but in your climate it is probably not a big deal.... any movement will cause the joists to "hinge" on the ledger... so assuming you have them sitting in joist hangers, they are in no danger of falling off even in a worst case scenario. The fractional amount of lift that you "might" have at the piers will be almost negligible at the ledger.

The bigger issue is, did you bolt and flash the ledger correctly?
 
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Old 04-23-16, 02:24 PM
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Thanks for the reply. My neighbour did the framing and structural part of the deck. I believe the ledger was fastend to the concrete foundation wall using the expanding lag bolt type things, and anchored about 2-2.5" into the foundation. My real concern here is the movement of the deck will cause damage to the concrete foundation by the ledger board being stressed. I'm not much of a handyman, but thinking logically it could "wiggle" a bit.

No flashing was used BTW. Going into concrete I didn't know that it was necessary.
 
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Old 04-23-16, 02:42 PM
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I should also note, the deck Is only 18" high. I would attach some pics, but unable to for some reason.
 
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Old 04-23-16, 05:15 PM
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see if this helps - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

If the pics are too big they will need to be resized before they will post. You could also put them on photobucket or similar and post the link.
 
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Old 04-23-16, 05:53 PM
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I see, didn't know it was concrete. In that case, see Figure 15 and table 5 in the following link if you want to double check that the ledger attachment and size / type of anchor is adequate.

http://www.awc.org/pdf/codes-standar...Guide-1405.pdf

Figure 15 also shows the use of sealant in lieu of flashing. With no sealant, water can freely run behind the ledger where freeze / thaw cycles will put added pressure on the anchors, potentially affecting their grip by damaging the holes they are in. Even if freezing isn't a problem, keeping the ledger as dry as possible prolongs its lifespan.
 
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Old 04-23-16, 06:33 PM
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Completing your profile will help us render a recommendation that is based on your area instead of just general knowledge. So, tell us where you are located. I think deck blocks are a useless item, as soon as you build, the weight of the deck will change the blocks. The also will settle over time. I don't think they are code compliant anywhere.
 
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Old 04-23-16, 08:53 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I don't see an option to choose a Canadian province, but I am in British Columbia, Canada. The weather here would be similar to Seattle. Very little snow, it rarely gets below freezing for more than a few days at a time in the winter, and it rains a lot all winter.

I agree that the blocks aren't ideal, especially having one end fixed to the house and the rest "floating". It's a small, low deck that if it fails in a few years time I can live with...obviously not ideal, but the experience has taught me a lot for the next one. What I can't afford is causing damage to the foundation. I would rather rip it up now than deal with bigger issues down the road if the current structure has potential to cause structural damage to the house. The first answer leads me to believe that it "should" be ok, but the more input and info I can get, the better.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 04-24-16, 06:30 AM
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Ledger should have been spaced out from the foundation for drainage.
1 X 4 PVC lumber cut to the width of the ledger and sitting vertical works for me.
It should have been through bolted, not just concrete anchors.
There should have been real footings, not deck blocks!
 
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Old 04-25-16, 09:24 PM
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Joecaption, I realize the way it was built wasn't the best way...which is why I posted the original question. If you have any input on my original post feel free to share.
 
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Old 04-25-16, 09:55 PM
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Don't worry about it. The deck guide shows that type of anchor is fine. Maybe someday the deck blocks will settle but it's probably not that big of a deal... it's a tiny deck so there is not a lot of weight on them and it's low to the ground. Yes it wasnt built 100% correct but its not going to fall down and its not going to crack your foundation. Have a good day.
 
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Old 04-25-16, 11:45 PM
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Thanks again for the feedback XSleeper. I just over think everything...probably should have done that before building it! I will enjoy the new addition to the yard and use what I learnt this time for the next project. Cheers. Jon
 
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