Deck Extension - Herringbone?

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Old 08-15-16, 07:19 PM
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Deck Extension - Herringbone?

I have a ~15 year old 10' X 27.5' deck (pressure treated pine with BM arborcoat semi-solid stain on a 45 degree angle) in good shape. I want to extend the deck ~7' to 17' X 27.5' which will require an additional 4 footers. Since the existing structure is on a 45 degree angle, should I have the extension installed on an opposite 45 degree angle (e.g. herringbone pattern)? Since the existing deck is 10' deep and the extension would be 7', the pattern won't 'match'. I could replace the existing structure but the price for the extension is much higher than I anticipated. Also, I am concerned the seam from existing deck to the new deck will not be even creating a hazard. The contract said that a parallel board would help eliminate that.

Thoughts?
 
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Old 08-15-16, 07:28 PM
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IIWM, I'd remove a foot and a half of the existing decking, and then install the new decking at the opposite 45 degree angle. That way the dividing line would be in the center. I wouldn't think much structure would need to be modified, if any, so it would just be the cost of another 45 square feet of decking. A center board parallel to the long edge would be a good idea.

It's still going to look added on; nothing short of replacing all the decking will change that, but I think having the split off center will look "off".
 
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Old 08-15-16, 07:39 PM
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Thanks for the fast reply. That makes sense. I got quotes of $2,500 - $3,500 just to replace the non-structure of the existing deck to have a branch new surface area which seems like an unnecessary for for aesthetics reasons. Why would the center board help reduce the seam? I thought that cutting back the existing deck to keep the pattern the same size would given a clean edge would help so not sure why the recommendation for the center board. Also, would the center board be the same width as the others? My neighbor extended his deck and there's a slight seam as he just bolted onto it. It's not bad but it is definitely noticeable. After the stain, I could not tell at all that it was an extension. How could a normal folk know the difference?
 
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Old 08-16-16, 03:33 AM
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As wood decking ages it changes the 'texture' of the wood and how it absorbs the stain. What type of stain used goes a long way in determining how prevalent the change is. Even with a solid deck stain which will guarantee that both old/new will be the same color - the age of the wood will be noticeable.

Not all folks are equally observant, what will be noticeable to some won't even cause others a second thought. Often discrepancies like that are forgotten about as you get used to the new deck.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 05:34 AM
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Thanks marksr. That does makes sense. I guess my only concern now is how will the horizontal board assist with removing/reducing the seam to make the existing deck flush with the new deck. Also, should the SOW include details as to wood species? The town needs a permit so a plan will need to be created. But, should the SOW include details such as exactly how the deck will be constructed? For example, wood species, wood size, dimensions between footings, size of concrete pad at base of stairs?
 
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Old 08-16-16, 05:52 AM
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I suggested a center board because I doubt the width of the new boards will exactly match the old boards due to age and drying over time. A center board would help mask those small variations. I don't think a center board is necessary to keep them even; best way to do that would be to cut slots in the ends of the boards (new and old) using a router or biscuit joiner and use splines or biscuits to join the ends. If the widths of the boards are close enough to look decent, skip the center board.

Regarding structure: the contractor will probably need to add blocking between the joists to support the cut ends of the decking, but that should be easy to do. you don't want the cut ends floating without support underneath.

The town will likely require details of the footings and stair landing for the permit, as well as information about joist sizes and spans. As to other info in the SOW, I'd say to include those details you care about and know enough about to evaluate.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 06:12 AM
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This is extremely helpful. I envy your handiness if I am being honest. I think the center board will look nice and will only help so I will go with that. I will discuss ways to make sure there is no/minimal seam as I have a 2 year old that's clumsy Maybe he plans to do as you suggested and didn't feel the need to discuss technicals with me. I have bad history with contractors so I will tell him to add additional detail just to make sure nothing seems out of place.

Last question: Is a concrete slab at the bottom of the stairs necessary? I currently have one and think it looks silly. Maybe pavers?
 
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Old 08-16-16, 06:43 AM
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Have you checked the contractor's references? looked at some of his completed work?

It's always best to have the bottom of the stairs [stringers] set on something solid that is at least slightly above grade. IMO a concrete slab works best. It would be ok to just have the concrete under the stringers and not jut out like a step/pad in front of the steps - you could start your pavers just past the bottom step.
 
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Old 08-16-16, 07:23 PM
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To be clear, the stairs should reside just above the concrete pad but I could add pavers in front of the pad which would be for aesthetics only. Did I understand?

I used read numerous Angie's List reviews but I have not reviewed the work personally. I could ask for references but everyone has "friends". Is that a bad approach?
 
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Old 08-17-16, 02:41 AM
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Correct, you want the bottom of the stringers to both have a solid base and be a little above grade. All the riser heights need to be consistent so that has to be kept in mind when cutting the stringer along with the proposed height of the pavers.

No contractor is going to supply a reference of a customer he's had problems with but it's customary to give references when asked. I'd be suspect of any contractor that either had no references or refused to supply them. I don't know much about Angie's List but suspect it's a good start.
 
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