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What do I do next? Small concrete entryway that taunts and humiliates me.

What do I do next? Small concrete entryway that taunts and humiliates me.

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  #1  
Old 10-19-16, 06:25 PM
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What do I do next? Small concrete entryway that taunts and humiliates me.

Hello,

This is my first post, and my first time coming to this site. Y'all are my last resort. The project I've taken on might have been a bit too much. I would rank my level of handiness as less than average, hence the screen name. Thank you for your time.

SHORT BACKSTORY - Wife owns the duplex, build in 1917. Wife wants me to paint the entryway of our duplex. It comprises of a small ground level landing (4.5 ft x 6.5 ft), 5 steps up, then another small entryway landing (4 ft x 8 ft). Top layer is light grey, looks like standard latex paint. It's peeling and cracking, plus someone painted over that black safety sandpaper stuff on the edge of the steps that drove me buts. It was my bright idea to say "Sure, but I need to strip it first."

Well, 3 weeks later, and I'm still not done stripping. I have reached Dante's 9th level of hell, because there are 9 layers of epoxy, maybe turpentine, maybe boat sealer, maybe whatever your worst nightmare is. My method of removal has been Jasco Epoxy Stripper, one of those 4" sharp knock down blades (I've gone through 3 blades, each blade has 2 sides), and a hammer.

Now I've gone over the surface twice. There's still a little bit of whatever is down there, but it's like 85% gone. The 15% that's stuck there, it's 100% NOT coming off with Jasco. I am done with the stripping and would like to move on.

What do I do next? Do I buy one of those Quikrete (or similar brand) Concrete Resurfacer kits? Do I have to acid wash it? Is there an option where I don't have to acid wash and can just throw some paint-like substance that works great?

Any help will do. I live in Los Angeles, so there's no rain, its really hot and never gets below 60, and a licensed professional will cost an arm and leg.

Thank you!
 
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  #2  
Old 10-19-16, 07:26 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Just to clarify a few things....

You are asking about the concrete floors (and steps?) correct?

Is the concrete in good condition except for the previous coatings you have mostly removed?
 
  #3  
Old 10-19-16, 11:14 PM
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Thank you so much!

Yes. I am talking about the 2 concrete landings and steps.

Yes, the concrete is mostly in good shape. It's really smooth and no large cracks...there's one or 2 super duper thin hairline cracks.

The steps are in good shape too...they're not 100% level, but don't forget this place was built almost 100 years ago. They are solid.

I should mention that the concrete is a terra cotta reddish color, it's not grey.

The first layer was green, the 2nd layer was fire engine red, the 3rd layer was maroon, and the 4th and final layer was grey. So what it looks like now is a Jackson Pollack painting...mainly terra cotta with some green and fire engine red blemishes...the risers of the steps are especially colorful.






I should express great gratitude to the youtuber whose video I watched that said "Hey, if you're using Jasco, keep your white vinegar close to neutralize any Jasco that gets on your skin". That stuff burns and burns *fast*.
 
  #4  
Old 10-20-16, 06:00 AM
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It sounds like the underlying coats were oil base or epoxy and then latex was just applied over it
It also sounds like only the failing coat of paint needed to be removed. You don't need to get it down to bare concrete to have a lasting paint job. The main thing is for the failing paint to be removed and for what's left to be sound and even enough where the new paint will look good.

pics could be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
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Old 10-20-16, 01:33 PM
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Thank you!

Here's a picture to get an idea. Name:  IMG_0012.jpg
Views: 142
Size:  43.9 KB

What kind of paint do I use? I would love to never touch these haunted concrete entryway again if possible.

This seems interesting...

Rust-Oleum EpoxyShield 1 gal. Concrete Resurfacer Kit-244025 - The Home Depot

I like that it goes down with a roller and it seems long lasting. Has anyone used this?

But I am just stabbing in the dark here. I am open to any and all recommendations.

Thank you!
 

Last edited by LessThanAverage; 10-20-16 at 01:35 PM. Reason: Tried to rotate the image. I failed...
  #6  
Old 10-20-16, 01:50 PM
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One more picture...a close-up to get more detail on the floor.

Name:  IMG_0014.jpg
Views: 52
Size:  50.1 KB
 
  #7  
Old 10-20-16, 03:04 PM
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Does the slab feel somewhat smooth or do those green areas feel like they raise up?
If it feels smooth I'd go ahead and paint, otherwise you'll need to sand or scrape until it feels smooth. Doesn't have to be perfect but you don't want raised up areas marring the new paint finish.

I've never used any of those restore type finishes. While I'm fundamentally opposed to them over wood, it might be ok over concrete. The biggest concern would be if it wears away or peels - what it will take to get it looking good again.
 
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Old 10-20-16, 03:06 PM
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Your secret weapon is a 4 1/2" grinder and a diamond cup wheel. Wear a respirator for the dust or grind it wet. That will prep the surface for an epoxy. Just keep the grinder moving so that you dont leave grooves in the surface.
 
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