Deck stain and Seal protection length Question


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Old 04-07-17, 05:25 AM
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Deck stain and Seal protection length Question

I have a new deck which I need to seal in the next month or two

I went to lowes to see what they had, and I saw the Olympic stain and seal combo

As I start looking at the different types, I noticed a 4, 6 and 10 year protection, but what is throwing me for a loop is they are all basically the same price.

Shouldn't the one with the longest protection be more expensive? Why are they priced the same? What is their actual difference?

4 year

6 year

10 year

The only difference I can see is the 10 year doesnt have premade color choices, but is tintable, so that gives me some more options

Thanks
 
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Old 04-07-17, 05:33 AM
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They are totally different types of stains. The 1st is a toner or translucent stain. It allows most of the wood's color/grain to show thru the stain. The 2nd is semi-transparent which colors the deck more and only allows a little of the wood's coloring to show thru. The 3rd is kind of like a thin paint [just doesn't need primer]

A lot depends on the look you want. Personally on a new deck I'd go with a translucent or semi-transparent stain. I generally save the solid stain for well worn decks near the end of their life. The more pigment in a stain allows it to fight the elements longer than the ones with less. A clear or almost clear stain has the shortest life expectancy, a solid stain the longest.

Most quality deck stains only last 2-4 yrs if exposed to the elements. It is hard to get a lasting job on wood that see the most sun and has moisture lay on it longer than it would on siding. The price of the stain is often a good indication of it's quality. Cheap deck stains often need recoating within a year
 
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Old 04-10-17, 12:58 PM
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Inflation has made this inaccurate now but it used to be that some people went by the rule of thumb that every $10/gallon your stain cost bought you a year until it had to be recoated. I'm lucky if I can go two years now on stuff over $30/gallon.
 
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Old 04-10-17, 04:48 PM
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We put in a new redwood deck just over a year ago. Sealed it with Cabot Australian Timber Oil. Looked great for about 9 mos., and now the deck boards are collecting a white stain to them I cannot figure out. Called the company and they suggested using their Problem Solver cleaner on a small area, and if that gets rid of this white crap, using it in a power washer to the whole deck surface, prior to re-staining. Whooopeee! Just how I want to spend my weekends. I researched like mad before deciding on the Cabot product, and the redwood was not yet completely dry when we used it, but the rainy season was on its way and we had to move on it. Live and learn...
 
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Old 04-10-17, 05:29 PM
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This is why I plead with folks to install decks with composite materials but that is water under the bridge right now.

Try Sikkens stains, I did use cedar for my railing posts and rails and they are still looking good after 6 years.

I realize they are not as exposed as the deck surface but this is good stuff.
 
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Old 04-10-17, 06:48 PM
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Well, we're talking over a 1,000 sq. ft. of decking, so composite was out of the budget. I have been in touch with Cabot and sent them photos as well. This weekend I will give their Problem Solver a try on a small area to see if it at least gets rid of this white crap that has surfaced, but it may come to sanding down the decking portion and refinishing (the railing/stairs, benches look fine). We will be selling this house within five years, and this deck needs to stay at least semi-attractive, whatever it takes. Will report back anything that proves useful as I proceed.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 03:57 AM
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the redwood was not yet completely dry when we used it
Could you further explain that? was the wood not seasoned/dry before the coating was applied? do you know if the lumber was kiln dried or air dried?
 
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Old 04-11-17, 03:36 PM
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The redwood was air dried. When it was delivered (about 2 weeks before being laid down) it was damp to the touch (redwood goes from harvest to mill to woodlot quickly in Calif these days, and doesn't sit around long; soon it will no longer be available for construction). It sat stacked in dry shade in a gravel parking area until needed, and then went in pretty quickly. We waited another couple of months before applying the finish to let it dry further, but then it began to change color (as redwood exposed to direct sunlight will do), so we spent a Saturday applying the Australian Timber Oil. You may remember a wildfire in Cent. Calif. last fall; the ash from that fire fell on us for days, so that may well be was was embedded in the deck from the foot traffic, which is the only part of the deck that is discolored. I will know more after this weekend when I've had a chance to use the cleaning agent.
 
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Old 04-11-17, 03:46 PM
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While I know nothing about air dried redwood, most air dried lumber takes about 6 months or so to dry. Redwood has a lot of tannins so that my be playing a part also. Was the airborne ash before or after you applied the oil? If after, how long after? Was the ash cleaned off promptly or just allowed to sit on the deck for an extended period?
 
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Old 04-11-17, 09:05 PM
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The ash arrived well after (probably a year or so) we stained the deck. I kept after it, and the deck wasn't getting any use during that period, so I don't think the ash was ground in, but again, it will be interesting to see how it cleans up. It just is what it is at this point, and I'm going to have to do what it takes to bring the wood back to an acceptable appearance so we can use it over the summer. Hopefully, Cabot's products and a power washer will do it; if not, light sanding is next. I just keep thinking how awful the wood we had before was; it was a tedious pleasure ripping it out, and I am not going to go through that again.
 
 

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