Paint deck extension

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Old 04-12-17, 07:18 PM
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Paint deck extension

I have a 16 year old deck that was extended by nearly 50% in the fall. I used a B&M Solid Stain 6 years ago and repainted 2 years ago. To ensure the deck matches, will I need to prime and apply 2 coats to the new deck extension and then an additional coat for the existing deck? I only used 1 coat of the B&M the last 2 applications and it's held up nicely.
 
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Old 04-13-17, 03:08 AM
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1-2 coats of stain should be fine. Depending on if the existing stain has faded you may need to recoat the old section. It won't be a perfect match no matter what you do because the new wood is slicker with tight grain while the old wood has weathered. While the color will be the same it may appear different at various angles or lighting.
 
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Old 04-13-17, 05:53 AM
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Yes - I was planning to do an additional coat for existing to ensure it looks as close as possible. Is primer necessary? A few contractors want to use oil based primer and 2 full coats.
 
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Old 04-13-17, 07:56 AM
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Generally a primer isn't needed with solid latex stain. Some light pastel colors do benefit from an oil base primer being applied first, especially if it's cedar or redwood.
 
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Old 04-13-17, 08:21 AM
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Thank you. I am getting high quotes (50% of the deck extension itself) for the painting so I am trying to understand why.
 
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Old 04-13-17, 10:06 AM
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That sounds like it would be high but then I'm neither there to see the job or have knowledge of the painting rates for your locale. Usually if you get 3 estimates that are all in the same price range - that is what it will cost. Any reason not to diy?
 
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Old 04-13-17, 11:12 AM
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Yes, my wife wants it done now.
 
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Old 04-13-17, 02:36 PM
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Tell her if she helps you it will get done twice as quick if she throws something, duck
 
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Old 04-17-17, 07:26 PM
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She is preggos so I am following orders.
 
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Old 04-18-17, 06:51 PM
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Last question. I am going back and forth with the primer coat. The local B&M paint store recommended the primer which I find interesting given the Arborcoat self priming. Assuming the 2 coats provide the necessary coverage, does the primer have any benefit to extend the life of the paint? Or is it strictly coverage?
 
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Old 04-19-17, 03:38 AM
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What type of wood is the decking? what color is the stain?
An oil base primer will seal any tannins or stains in the wood. Generally not a concern with pressure treated pine although sometimes pine will have discoloration at knot holes. Usually only noticeable with light colors.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 05:17 AM
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Pressure Treated Pine. B&M Hidden Valley (red-ish tint) and 98.1% positive that is a SOLID.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 05:29 AM
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You would never apply primer under any stain that wasn't a solid stain. I'm not convinced that any benefits from priming would outweigh the added expense/work. If I did anything it would be to add about 15-20% Flood's EmulsaBond to the 1st coat of latex stain. You might question BM as to why they recommend priming first. I don't often use BM coatings and they might know something about their stain that I don't.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 06:16 AM
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The local B&M store owner (25+ years) said 'it is always a good idea to add the B&M Arborcoat Primer as it will last longer. Go figure.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 08:41 AM
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I looked at the BM website and couldn't find an Arborcoat primer - just stains ??
 
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Old 04-19-17, 08:59 AM
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https://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/...exterior-stain Exterior Oil Primer

B&M can't have it both ways. Either the stain/paint is SELF PRIMING or you NEED to apply priming.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 09:08 AM
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Thanks for the link, not sure why I couldn't find it For the most part that primer is the same as most any other exterior oil base primer.

Latex stains are self priming. An oil base primer is needed IF there are tannins in the wood that will bleed thru and discolor the stain [mostly a cedar or redwood issue], some type of stain that has discolored the wood and can't easily be wash off or if there is some type of contaminate that would hinder the stain's adhesion [again, one that won't wash off]
 
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Old 04-19-17, 09:31 AM
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It sounds like it isn't as important as I am made to believe.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 12:23 PM
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He might just be a good salesman could also be trying to cover his butt for the rare times that a primer is needed. While I've used primer under a solid latex deck stain it's not something I've routinely done - just as needed and it doesn't sound like you need to.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 12:52 PM
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I spoke to the contractor that I really liked and he said "go with the 2 coats without a primer. All of my work is 3 years guaranteed so you are covered with or without primer.".
 
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Old 04-19-17, 12:58 PM
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That is a good guarantee! Has he been in business long? and expected to stay in business?
I don't think I ever warranted my work for more than 1 yr.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 12:59 PM
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25 or 28 years. Angie's List (for whatever that is worth). I use Angie List strictly as it give some SOME data to consider.
 
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Old 04-19-17, 01:16 PM
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"25 or 28 years" xxxxxxxxxSounds good
 
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