Pavers meet front door Flashing/Threshold

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Old 06-17-17, 10:31 PM
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Unhappy Pavers meet front door Flashing/Threshold

So I now realize I contracted a guy with very little experience paving porches. Said he has done brick work for 30 years and I never inquired specifically about dealing with porches, flashings, etc. My mistake, but now I have to deal with the issue and I am here for advice.

There are 3 steps steps up to the front door, and you can see the last 2 steps in the pictures. The pavers being used at the top where it meets the door will be thinner than usual, because we are trying to accommodate for the height of the threshold/flashing. Best we can do seems to be end up FLUSH with the flashing. That accounts for a thin mortar layer.

I realize this is generally a stupid idea. But I also want to ask:

1) whether the fact that the door is already this far up over ground and under an eave, makes it less of an issue? This assumes we have no snow or water up near front door (and in fact we don't) except during our yearly monster rain/wind storm.

2) How would one approach the mating between the pavers and the existing flashing? the flashing seems to have weep holes. Major issue covering those I suppose too.

3) Same issue with pavers hitting the molding... what to do here? Just have him lay down some water barrier?

3) What other solutions? Perhaps NOT paving the top stoop (ugly!) and in this case I would be left with a tiny 2" step* right at the door transitioning from the heringbone patterned pavers to the concrete stoop.
*I can see EVERYONE tripping already!

Thanks for any help. This is a lesson learned for me. The problem is not knowing what to ask... I should know better and should have done research, but I have serious medical issues to deal with lately and something has to give.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 03:08 AM
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The column is decorative, I would undercut so the bricks go fully under.

Weep holes on a front door? I dont think so, you want to keep water out of that area so not sure what you are seeing. Can that angle piece be removed so you are flush with the threshold?
 
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Old 06-18-17, 05:12 AM
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Possibly transition to a stamped concrete pattern for your stoop so that you can have a similar look without the height differential you will get with the pavers.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 07:03 AM
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First, it's not a "flashing", just an aluminum door sill- part of the door. I doubt this is much of an issue, especially since the door is largely out of the weather. Looks like your caulking in front failed long ago... that should be cleaned off and redone.

I would have a shop custom make an aluminum z-flashing, to be used like a Schluter edge. The bricks would set on top of one leg, the vertical leg would be plumb with the back side of the brick, and the other horizontal leg would lay on top of your existing sill, possibly with a little downturn angle so that the seam lays nice and tight. This would cover up the void created by the weird angle on the sill, and also cover the weep holes while still providing a little space where a few drops of water could harmlessly collect and evaporate.

Undercutting the columns is a good idea and would work, but depending on what those bases are made of (if it isn't wood and is fiberglass, pvc or foam) nothing wrong with paving around them.

Might look and work better if you picture framed all 4 sides of your stoop with a border, and where the walk meets the step. I see he has a border along the sides, so I would suggest a border at the step riser as well. Your risers would likely be vertical and would align with this upper and lower border... and you should likely have the front border on the top of the stoop protrude over the risers 1" to form a sill nose.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 10:03 AM
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Thanks all for the prompt replies. very helpful. I plan to have the faux columns cut and then the brick slides underneath. Will eliminate intricate brick cutting as well, so that's a nice bonus.

Xsleeper:
Does the attached image faithfully represent the overall design and positioning of the Z-Flashing (shown in RED)?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-18-17, 11:15 AM
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No, because your drawing of the "old door sill" does not match the existing shape of your sill nose. (Middle pic... slide that brick back and it hits the front edge of the sill nose. That is where the z-flashing would sit, covering and creating a 1" void. The void would not bend if this was bent out of a medium gauge aluminum) It also would not be as long as what you show, only 1 1/2" at most.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 07:09 PM
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Oh you're right, I messed up my graphic. This is what you mean then?
 
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Old 06-18-17, 07:17 PM
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Yes, but as I said, the horizontal part only needs to be long enough to cover the gap. Or it could bend downward toward the weep holes.
 
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Old 06-18-17, 07:20 PM
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Then Im afraid I dont understand. Do you have the ability to modify my drawing to show me what you mean?

Alternatively Im thinking about just having about 12 pavers cut in a section like the following... would this be OK?
 
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Old 06-18-17, 07:29 PM
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Yes that would be an option.
 
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Old 06-19-17, 09:34 AM
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Hasn't been mentioned but there's very little variability allowed in the height of steps - have you changed the rise by adding the pavers?
 
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Old 06-19-17, 10:14 AM
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When you put a paver on the sidewalk and a paver on the stoop the rise does not change. It's a single step.
 
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Old 06-19-17, 11:55 AM
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Absolutely right, Brant. Here's the part which made me concerned about this at all:
There are 3 steps steps up to the front door, and you can see the last 2 steps in the pictures.
If all, including the sidewalk got pavers, then my concern has been addressed.
 
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Old 06-19-17, 12:18 PM
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Wow how did I miss that? I must have only been looking at the picture!
 
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Old 06-26-17, 06:18 PM
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Question

So the pavers were all set and mortared. Now the contractor says it still needs to be cleaned up with Muriatic acid. I can see how that would help with the excess Mortar on the brick, but this is more than just a film.... do you you guys think this job was excessively sloppy? Or is this par for the course?

I'm expecting this to be cleaned up so that every brick is clearly delineated at the borders without all the excess mortar build up beyond the 'grout lines'. Possible? All part of the process?
 
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Old 06-29-17, 05:49 AM
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Anyone? Would really like to know
 
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Old 06-29-17, 06:30 AM
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Yes, thats why bricks get acid washed.
 
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Old 07-18-17, 12:22 PM
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I cleaned everything thoroughly with Muriatic Acid. It cleaned up pretty well. However I still have sloppy mortar that is fairly thick and overflowing the grooves onto the bricks. Not sure how to clean that up unless I chisel out or something. Ideas?
 
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Old 07-18-17, 12:47 PM
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Only you're going to notice this, I would leave it and move on to the next project.
 
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Old 07-18-17, 01:11 PM
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You can rub some of it off by using another brick, or possibly a rub brick... but be very careful that you aren't scratching up the face of your bricks. Then acid wash again... might need a stiffer brush... or even a wire brush.

I'm really surprised he left this for you to do, it's usually the contractors job. The mortar is also near full strength after 3 weeks... should have been done back in June.
 
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Old 07-18-17, 01:39 PM
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THanks I will try rubbing off as suggested. Yeah the contractor fell off the face of the planet. I wish I had realized about the sloppy job before paying.

Do you think using a pressure washer could help?
 
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