Concrete pad for generator


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Old 07-31-17, 04:29 AM
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Concrete pad for generator

Hi all, I don't quite know where to post this so I thought I'd give it a shot in here. Mods, if this is the incorrect location, please, move if you feel it needs to be elsewhere.

I need to pour a concrete slab for an emergency generator. I live in NH where the frost can at time go quite deep. I want to be sure I do this the right way the first time. How do I go about preparing the site before pouring the concrete to prevent the ground from heaving in the winter time? Approximate dimensions are 3 1/2 feet wide by 6 feet long. I should mention that the ground has a lot of clay in it. Thanks in advance for the suggestions. Roger
 
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Old 07-31-17, 04:55 AM
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And how would that work out when there's 4' of snow on the ground, the gen set would be buried.
I'd build a platform for it, sort of like building a small deck with the footings set below the frost line.
 
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Old 07-31-17, 06:28 AM
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joecaption - I had given that some thought. We've had the gen set for perhaps the past 15 years at it's current location, about a foot away from the house but for some reason the building inspector now wants it moved. The former inspector, when it was installed, at the time said the location was just fine. The new inspector says it has to be moved at 5 feet from the house. When it was first installed, my dad left it on the shipping pallet, on the ground. Now that I know I have to move it, I want to do it right. The more I think about it, the more I like that idea of a deck. Due to a lower back problems, handling bags of concrete, well you get the idea; handling wood products would be much easier on my back. I guess I could build it out of pressure treated lumber, perhaps 2X6's on piers. Do you know of any other noncombustible material I could use?

As for 4 feet of snow burrying it, after every snow storm I shovel around it to keep the air vents and exhaust open. Roger
 
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Old 07-31-17, 06:52 AM
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I would suggest doing two things. First, contact the building inspector to be sure it's OK to place it on a combustible and/or raised pad. That's not a normal installation, although I think it's a great idea. Not all inspectors have the ability to think beyond what's normally done. Second, call the generator manufacturer and ask if there's any "gotcha's" to putting it on a raised wood pad. An e-mail response from a manufacturer will probably convince a hesitant inspector that it's OK. Here in MN generators are almost always put on a concrete pad that has to move with frost.
 
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Old 08-01-17, 02:52 AM
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A cement pad would be dug sown around 9" with compacted sand gravel base. No footers, your driveway and walkways dont have them, neither would this! Drainage is key, any water needs someplace to go.

Raised "deck like structure" doesn't sound feasible, not a solid foundation, I would recommend checking with the manufacture for their recommendations!
 
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Old 08-01-17, 03:32 AM
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You could do a raised concrete slab. Basically a four sided box of concrete block or more decorative blocks filled with sand and a concrete slab poured on top
 
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Old 08-01-17, 07:00 AM
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Wood vs Concrete

A wood structure will be more prone to vibrate and more noisy.
 
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Old 08-01-17, 07:04 AM
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A wood structure will be more prone to vibrate and more noisy
And rot quicker than concrete.
 
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Old 08-02-17, 08:50 AM
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After reading all of the suggestions and concerns from members in this forum, coupled with the concern from the building inspector of combustible material in the vicinity of hot exhaust, I've decided to pour a concrete slab for it. The inspector could not cite a code against the use of a wood product but his concern is a valid one. Thanks for your input everyone. Roger
 
 

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