Replacing tongue & groove porch floor with composite decking

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Old 06-04-18, 08:32 AM
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Replacing tongue & groove porch floor with composite decking

My house has a brick porch on the front with a tongue & groove wood floor. The sides of the porch are open, so the floor is exposed to a lot of weather. Previous owner put outdoor carpet over the wood, after pulling back the carpet I see why- the paint looks terrible and the wood is rotted at the ends of the porch from all the rain and snow getting on it all the time. The carpet is in bad shape now as well.

I want to tear it all out and replace it with composite decking, however I have never worked with that stuff before. How does the grooved decking work, are there some sort of clips that go in the grooves? It seems fairly straightforward, I'm just trying to understand the nuances of it so maybe I could pick some of it up later this summer to get that porch fixed up.
 
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Old 06-04-18, 11:33 AM
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If you are referring to the 5 1/4 boards yes, they have clips that attach the boards to the joists so they are considered invisible.

So is there a wood structure in this brick porch that the decking is attached too?
 
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Old 06-05-18, 09:53 AM
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As far as I know, yes. It is an elevated brick porch (floor level is probably 3 feet above ground) and there is access under the porch so I'm under the assumption there are some joists of some sort under the existing flooring. I have not actually looked though.
 
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Old 06-05-18, 02:34 PM
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Did you know they make composite that looks just like that old T & G?
You'll get sticker shock when you start checking out the prices on just the materials.
The joist can be no more than 16", so you may have to add more.
 
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Old 06-05-18, 04:15 PM
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You'll get sticker shock when you start checking out the prices on just the materials.

But you have to look beyond the initial outlay, My deck is 10 years old, looks like new, never had to sand, stain, or replace a board. No splinters, no cracks, no warpage!

Clean up in the spring and it;s good for the year.

As far as I;m concerned the composite is an absolute bargain!
 
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Old 06-06-18, 05:13 AM
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I agree with you Marq1.
But most DIY'S I've dealt with have no clue how much more it cost to do it right.
Back when I used to have to do deck quotes all the time most would say they wanted to build one "with that new stuff"
I'd come back with two quotes and start by showing them the one for the vinyl and composite.
Most would think I was trying to rip them off when they saw the price.
Having the other quote already in hand would save me from having to go back with another quote.
 
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Old 06-06-18, 07:47 AM
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Keep in mind that unless you go with the T&G style composite, you will have open spaces between deck boards. Whereas, with your T&G floor today, the underside and whatever is below stayed fairly dry, that will not be the case with the decking. Perhaps you have a roof that keeps out most of the rain and such but those gaps make for a very different waterproofing arrangement.

- Peter
 
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