Entry Door Rot

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  #1  
Old 08-04-18, 06:11 AM
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Entry Door Rot

I wasn't sure where to put this, but since the door is on my front porch I figured I'd put it here.

The house is 6 years old and this is the original entry door. Both corners are rotting pretty good. The gutters are functioning properly but the door gets splashed in a heavy rain.





I also wonder about the brickwork under the sill. I know water is getting in there as there's no seal there. It has to be running between the bricks since the mortar doesn't go the whole way back. Shouldn't that be sealed?

Anyway, my real question is how to fix the door. It looks like it was pre-fabbed. So, I don't know whether I can get it apart without destroying it and if I do get it apart whether that's standard sized lumber. I guess I can cut anything down to size. Or, is there something I can fill and sculpt these rotten areas with?
 
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Old 08-04-18, 06:22 AM
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Sounds like it should have had a storm door on it. Depends how bad the rot is. They do make wood hardeners and wood epoxies if you want to go that route... but you will often be doing it again as the wood continues to rot and decay from getting wet. Same would go for sculpting with caulk... it's just a temporary fix.

if you cut out the rot (oscillating tool works best, like Fein Multimaster) you just cut wood to fit on a table saw and piece it in. Sealing up the edges is the key to stopping the rot, so you often use construction adhesive or caulk as you glue it back together... and then you need just a little filler as you fill and sand the edges of your repair to try and make it invisible. It's kind of like body work in a way. Then prime and paint. And think about adding a storm door to keep the rain off. With a decorative entry door you usually want a full view glass door with vents. On your door you would need to extend the mullions first in order to mount a storm door.

As for the brick sill, the brick usually has enough slope and the door sill has enough overhang to keep it dry. Caulking it can sometimes backfire by not allowing water that gets in to drain out.
 
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Old 08-04-18, 06:22 AM
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How high up does the rot go? Ideally you'd replace the rot with fresh wood. Sometimes it isn't a big deal to cut out a bottom portion and replace that with wood [dutchman] Filler only works on small areas and only if the surrounding wood is solid.
 
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Old 08-04-18, 08:56 AM
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Thanks for the reply. The rot is in the corners for the sidelights - I don't think a storm door would have helped (though I've wanted to get one anyway). The wood is pretty soft. I think I will invest in an oscillating tool (always wanted one of those, too) and cut out the bad stuff. I'll just have to be sure to paint and seal the replacement wood really well so it doesn't wick up like it's doing now.
 
  #5  
Old 08-04-18, 09:38 AM
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I'd be removing all of that wooden brick molding, cutting out that rotten section of wood and replacing all of it with Vinyl.
No more rot issues.
If those mullin strips are also rotten they sell vinyl mullin strips also.
 
  #6  
Old 08-04-18, 04:29 PM
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we repair those ofen & use nothing but pvc down here + always recommend storm doors,,, they're not popular for some reason in atl
 
  #7  
Old 08-04-18, 04:37 PM
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I suggest pulling the entire board out and replacing it with a pvc board.

Like this ........ https://www.lowes.com/pd/Royal-Mould...ard/1000443053
 
  #8  
Old 08-04-18, 06:00 PM
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You can have storm panels made for the sidelights. Any glass shop can make you a piece of glass with an aluminum frame.
 
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Old 08-05-18, 05:14 AM
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I had a similar problem several years ago and repaired it by cutting out rotted wood and replacing with new wood sealed with lots of caulk. I figured it was temporary at best, but so far, so good!
Steve
 
  #10  
Old 08-05-18, 07:28 AM
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Most of the rot comes from the board ends not being primed or painted, allowing the wood to soak up whatever water is available.
 
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