Looking to build a roofed structure for a faux wishing well

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  #1  
Old 07-19-19, 05:18 AM
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Looking to build a roofed structure for a faux wishing well

I built a stacked-stone wishing well to cover an ugly dry well in my side yard. The well itself and the basic structure for a roofed cover are done, but now I'm vacillating on how to build the rest; a picture of what I have is attached.

Basically, what do I use for the triangular frame at either end? I.e., the parts that the horizontal roof boards will be screwed/nailed to (parts E and F in the attached drawing). I started picking up some treated 2x4s, but I'm trying to keep the superstructure as light as possible, and thought that would already start with a good amount of weight.

Treated 2x3s are, apparently, not widely available. That leaves 2x2s or some sort of 1x. Should I use untreated 2x3s and use some protecting stain or finish? I was going to stain the whole thing anyway. Or should I use a 2x2?

FWIW, because of high winds in the area, I'm looking to design the roof with some sort of venting, so I don't get a parachute effect
 
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Old 07-19-19, 05:39 AM
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No need to use treated lumber under the roof. What will the roof dimensions be?
 
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Old 07-19-19, 06:42 AM
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54" long (measured from outside of each 4x4) by about 36" (the hypotenuse of each downslope combined). I'm thinking the triangle's wood will be exposed at each end--I'm avoiding covering the ends to help avoid that parachute effect.

Here's the sort of wind I get here, from my weather station for last year (bottom line: sustained winds: top line: gusts).
 
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Old 07-19-19, 06:49 AM
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If you can find some old growth wood that would work for the roof. It's much more durable than the fast growing stuff used today to produce lumber. It was used well over a hundred years ago for sheeting the exterior of buildings and never even got painted. With the current reclaimed lumber craze you should be able to find some relatively easy.
 
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Old 07-19-19, 06:57 AM
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I'm trying to figure out the support structure more than the roofing material--E&F in the diagram, not G. It would be a shame to bury nice wood like that.
 
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Old 07-19-19, 07:38 AM
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If painted those boards can be regular framing lumber, if stained or left uncoated - use pressure treated. But you'll need rafters in between the 2 ends to support whatever you use on the roof.
 
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Old 07-19-19, 03:37 PM
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More than one rafter?

I was thinking I can mount the end ones inside the 4x4x, with the roof overlapping the 4x4. I'd use wedges to screw them in to. This way, since I'd have to put the inner rafters on the 4x4, their layout/height would match.

If I'm going to use an exterior paint, does it matter what lumber dimension I use as the base frame? I'm using a 2x2 in the picture below simply because its was some scrap I had around to visualize things, not because of a decision to use it.
 
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Old 07-19-19, 04:34 PM
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I'd use 2x4's for two reasons. First off, from an aesthetic standpoint, I think 2x2's are going to look disproportionate, and, from a construction standpoint, those 4x4's will carry the weight but will twist and crack open, not might but will, just the nature of the beast, so you want good and solid connections, and the 2x4's provide a big advantage in that regard. 54" long, I would probably do two pair of intermediate rafters mostly for the strength of the framing, but also to ensure no sags on whatever you doing on top. For the exposed gables, I'd probably go with stained rough sawed cedar or aluminum fascia. Just my opinions, but the neat part of things like this is that its' yours, and its' strictly decor, nobody's living under it, so you can be as creative or not as you want.
 
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Old 07-19-19, 04:55 PM
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With the weight it's going to be carrying should I replace the 2x4 crosspiece with a 2x6?
Or should I attach a lower 2x4 crosspiece and screw the bottom of the rafter triangle to that? That is, attach the triangle's top,
/\
over and to existing 2x4, and sit on top of (and attach to) the bottom
___
of the triangle to a lower 2x4?
 
  #10  
Old 07-20-19, 08:21 AM
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... was modeling the roof with some scrap 2x4s. They look awfully large relative to the everything.
 
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Old 07-31-19, 05:21 AM
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All right, it's mostly done, at least the major stuff. Next is to put in a spindle and bucket. I was debating and figured there's no point in making it actually work--there's a grate right at the base anyway, so it can't actually go anywhere.

I can get 1.5" or 2" dowels--untreated, so I'd have to do something about that. The 2" would be 48" long, the 1.5" is 72"; the inside span between the posts is 44".

If I used the two-inch I could only run it inside, since it wouldn't run all the way through the posts and the space between (51" total). That would mean making separate (unconnected) lengths on the outside of the posts: fake ends to the spindle, including a crank. I don't know quite how to do this: make 1" deep 2" D holes opposite each other, cut the rod down to 46" and... I don't think it would be flexible enough to be able to get it into the holes. I could cut a slot from the hole to the edge, slide in the rod, then glue a cover in place.

If I used the 1.5" I could go all the way through and have a single connected piece. The problem there is that the holes would have to be perfectly perpendicular; off by even a couple of degrees and it'll be quite a bit off. Tricky to do in a 4x4, even with a homemade jig.

Any thoughts?
 
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Old 07-31-19, 09:35 AM
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You could use PVC pipe for the shaft and paint it black or brown. It would be highly weather resistant and probably outlast the wood parts.

One thing you could do is use a piece of 3/4" or 1" PVC to go all the way through your uprights. One end can protrude so you can mount a handle. Then have a section of 2" PVC inside the frame for the rope reel or pulley. Insert the smaller PVC through the frame and through the larger 2". That way the smaller pipe holds the bigger one between the uprights. The crank handle won't work but it will be easy to assemble in the field.
 
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Old 08-05-19, 03:47 PM
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And here we go... The crank doesn't actually work--I figured that would just be silly, all things considered.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 02:59 AM
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Looks good

My only concern would be rain water collecting in the wood joints on the roof.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 04:14 AM
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The rain should drain through the cracks and as the wood ages it will probably shrink opening the cracks up even more.

Nice looking well. Trouble is I want to go turn the crank and make the bucket go up and down.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 04:50 PM
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I put 8d nails in for spacers between the roof boards--I screwed the bottom board in place and tapped the 8d nails into the rafters (just deep enough to hold) right above the 1x6 and flush with it. I screwed in the board above that* using the nails to give me a small gap, took out the spacer nails, and put them in above the second board, and so on. So there are small, even spaces between the boards to let things dry out.

* I couldn't get 1x6x10s. Lowes USED to have them, but by an annoying coincidence pulled those lengths from the shelves the week before I went to buy them. x10' would have been perfect because I needed 54" lengths, and a 10 footer would have given me two lengths per board. So I used an 8', and cut the remaining 42" length down to come to the middle of the third rafter, then I cut 4 foot-long lengths from another x8 to span the remaining distance. I staggered them, alternating how they were placed:

____54___
__42___12
____54___
12___42__
 
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Old 08-07-19, 03:22 AM
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I put 8d nails in for spacers between the roof boards-
Good, I had assumed the boards were butted up to each other.
 
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Old 08-07-19, 04:33 AM
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Mainly, I considered the effort involved in getting a perfectly straight hole through the 4x4 for the shaft, and decided I didn't want the headache.

The only other touch I've been considering is some sort of cover for the eaves. I'd left them open because I'm trying to avoid a parachute effect--we get really strong winds here--but it looks a little unfinished.
 
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Old 08-07-19, 04:54 AM
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I like it. Most wells (real ones) in my area had very simple roofs. They were poor farmers with hand dug wells so nothing was fancy.
 
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Old 08-17-19, 03:40 PM
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Thanks!
The only other thing I was trying to figure out was what sort, if any, of landscaping I should do right around it--plants or stones. This is a drainage well, after all, and water has to be able to reach it. I do get periodic coastal flooding (i.e., salt water), so I'm limited in what I can plant.

The picture below is the sort of thing I can expect a couple of times a year; the well is now on the left/middle of the shot.
 
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