Packing down gravel driveway?

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-10-19, 03:34 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 9
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Packing down gravel driveway?

I have a gravel driveway/parking area, not very long, roughly 35x50. I think whoever installed it used the wrong gravel - looks like cleaned 3/4 crushed granite with no sand or dust or anything to hold it together. It's probably about 6" deep in a lot of areas. The problem is it's like soft sand - everything sinks into it and leaves big tracks. I can smooth it back out again but it won't last. It's almost impossible to back up a car without slinging some gravel.

What should I do to fix this? I'm thinking if I used some kind of plate compactor it wouldn't help, because there is just nothing to hold the gravel together. Can I sprinkle a mix of sand/cement over it? Or should I skip trying to use cement and do something else?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-10-19, 10:52 PM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 4,140
Received 74 Votes on 67 Posts
looks like cleaned 3/4 crushed granite
The crushed granite sounds good, but from your description the base of the drive is soft causing the material to move/sink.

Adding cement of sand probably isn't going to do much but add to the mess, sounds like you need to dig it up and get a thicker base of crushed stone!
 
  #3  
Old 08-11-19, 02:26 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,873
Received 95 Votes on 89 Posts
I'm afraid Marq is right. 6" is awfully thick for small gravel, when the base is soft or needs to be built up like that you need to start with larger rock.
 
  #4  
Old 08-11-19, 04:55 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,389
Received 19 Votes on 17 Posts
You really need to know what is under that gravel. I have tried to compact gravel on top of poor soil and clay and it just keeps sinking especially during the rain season. At some point you may need to salvage what gravel you can and then remove a substantial amount of that poor soil, think several feet. Then compact the new fill in 6" layers to the desired depth.

Your soil may not be that bad and that is why you need to do some digging to find out. Sometimes just a post hole digger will do that job.

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 08-11-19, 02:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 9
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It has nothing to do with the soil. Nothing is sinking into the dirt. It is a heavy layer of washed/screened stone. There is nothing to hold it together. It's like a layer of soft snow.
 
  #6  
Old 08-11-19, 03:08 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,389
Received 19 Votes on 17 Posts
Sorry if I offended you by trying to give complete advice. You are there and we are a thousand miles away. Extract what fits and discard the rest.

Stone dust might help but might also get lost trying to fill all of the voids.

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 08-11-19, 03:27 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 20,522
Received 161 Votes on 151 Posts
Since it's such a thick layer it will be difficult to incorporate fines to help lock everything together. I would get some stone dust and hand sling it in a thin layer over the area. Let it get some use and rain to wash it in. Then re-apply more.

Unfortunately I don't know a way to use machinery to spread the stone dust in a thin and even enough manner with a front end loader. It always comes out too thick which causes it to bridge over the gravel without settling down into it.
 
  #8  
Old 08-11-19, 03:42 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 22,889
Received 161 Votes on 152 Posts
I think the best equipment to use would be a skid loader, spreading backward with the bucket after you dump a small pile. And since its all currently clean gravel, (should have been 3/4 minus, which means down to zero) spreading fines on top isn't going to magically produce a solid surface immediately. I'd get a load of 1/4 minus and put it in a pile. Just spread a thin layer on top. Driving on it will shift the base around and the fines will tend to disappear. Then add another thin layer when you feel it needs to be graded again. Each time it will get a little more firm, until you get those fines worked down into the base.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: