Shed Framing/Load Question


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Old 09-28-19, 07:47 PM
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Shed Framing/Load Question

Hi everyone. First time poster here and a question regarding the shed Im going to build. I attached a picture of what the floor framing currently looks like. Haven't build the shed just yet so I have the opportunity to modify. This is to be an 8x10 shed made of barn board and 2x4's for the structure.

Anyways...the original plan was to run 4x4's over 2 lengths of concrete piers and account for about 1' cantilever. Then structure the floor with 2x6s running perpendicular (similar to how one would build a deck. Only issue with that (and stupid me for not really thinking it through until the footings were poured), but that would put the shed floor over 12" above grade. So what was suggested to me was to just frame the shed directly on the saddles as the picture shows. I'm not so worried about the 8' lengths as that is somewhat still compliant with proper beam/joist theory, but the walls are going to be build on the 10' lengths with that 10' 2x6 basically floating, minus a couple blocks tying it into the beam ( the beam is composed of 2 2x6s sitting in a 4x4 bracket with 1/2" OBS to fill the gap). All wood for the floor structure is PT btw.

I've asked a couple people and they didn't really think twice about saying it'll surely still be fine but I just thought I'd ask around here for some extra reassurance or anything I can do to beef it up a bit more before I build on top. Maybe a few more blocks on the 10' edges is the best I can do?

Thanks!
 
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Old 09-28-19, 08:25 PM
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If you are looking for improvements on that design, your top and bottom rim joists should not be single boards, they should be doubled boards because of the sq ft of floor that they are going to have to support. They should be hung from the ends of your beams with doubled joist hangers. That will effectively create a cantilvered end beam on each end, for your joists to nail to... and it transfers the weight to the foundation better. Use joist hangers for them too.

If you wanted to alter the design slightly, here is a different idea. Hope it's not too hard to follow. Turn your beams 90 degrees, and use 3 of them, 8 ft long. You would then have a single rim joist on the left and right sides. Your top and bottom rim joist would be single, and fastened onto the ends of the left and right rims... the corners reinforced with Simpson L70Z L-brackets. All your joists would still run north to south but would be in hangers between those beams.... and between the beam and top and bottom rim. Those top and bottom 8' rims could be single as long as the ridge is 10' long and the load bearing walls are left and right, because of the small amount of sq ft of floor that is cantilevered. To help support those load bearing walls on the left and right, you would throw some blocking in between your first pair of outside joists.

Reason this last plan might be better is because of where I suspect your load bearing walls will be. (depending on the roof direction, it decides which walls are your load bearing walls.) Gable walls do not have roof (snow) load... the walls your rafters sit on do.

So I'm going under the assumption that your roof ridge will be 10' long, meaning your rafters will sit on the walls on the left and right of your drawing. If that's the case, they are sitting on the weakest point of the whole floor. But if you turn the beams 90 degrees, those walls would be sitting on 3 beams. The fact that those 3 beams would be cantilevered is not a problem.

If your roof goes the opposite direction, then my first paragraph would be the way I'd suggest you go.

Just a few thoughts. But yeah, it's a shed so...
 
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Old 09-28-19, 10:17 PM
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Thank you for those ideas! Youre right about the roof being the 10 length, and also why I have the bit of paranoia about it. But the but its a shed, so... is the point. Its just a shed, sooo should be good enough? Im just looking to know that its not gonna start bending on me. Not trying to build a house here.

I would have considered turning the beams but I have the rcps saddles and Id have to cut all the faces off to turn the other way.

What if I just buy 2 more 2x6x10 and cut them to 117 and sister them to the inside of the outer 10 lengths?
 
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Old 09-29-19, 03:03 AM
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If I interpret your situation correctly the saddles are fairly high off the ground.

Perhaps you could use strap type joist hangers to run a beam/hanging support under your 2X6 floor.
Use the widest lumber that will still give you some ground clearance under them.

These hangers can be expensive so probably just metal straps or even 2X4 vertical blocking should do the trick.
 
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Old 09-29-19, 06:17 AM
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Im only a couple inches off the ground in the high spot. Id gladly stick a patio slab under there if I knew it wouldnt heave and damage the floor structure
 
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Old 09-29-19, 06:40 AM
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If you can't turn the beams, then do it as described in the first paragraph. Use the Simpson L70Z angles to help join the left and right rim to the top and bottom beam. Sister the far left and right joust so it's a double and add more blocking to the first pair of outside joists. And glue the heck out of your plywood subfloor.

Yep, it's only a shed, and is now a learning experience.
 
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Old 10-01-19, 03:35 PM
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Was just thinking...Does it make sense to change the pitch of the roof the opposite way? So its the 8 peak length? Or are we splitting hairs at this point? Does it really matter?
 
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Old 10-01-19, 04:15 PM
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That would be better, yes.
 
 

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