Air gap between brick and framing.

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Old 10-25-19, 02:00 PM
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Air gap between brick and framing.

Iím building a heated basement entrance. I was talked out of removing the brick. Now I realize cold air easily flows into and out of the air gap between the brick and framing. I thought of drilling holes in the brick for access to use great stuff foam to block the air flow. What do you think?
 
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Old 10-25-19, 05:06 PM
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Iím building a heated basement entrance.
Define what a heated basement entrance is?
 
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Old 10-25-19, 05:37 PM
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That's a bad idea. You should do nothing about that gap since it's supposed to be there. The air gap is there as a drainage plane for any moisture that gets behind the brick, and it's supposed to run down the felt paper until it gets to weep wicks... Or if this is old preexisting brick with no weep holes, the space allows that moisture to harmlessly dry out. There are millions of houses built that way so yours is not unusual.

If you just want to foam the air gap at the perimeter of the door opening before you put the trim on, I don't see the harm in doing that.
 
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Old 10-28-19, 08:05 AM
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The basement entrance is 18 feet long 5 feet wide and goes from the basement floor to the main level roof. So it is two stories with a flight of stairs. There is 18 feet of formerly brick exterior wall that is now an interior wall. There should be no problem with moisture now that it is an interior wall. If it is left as is, the exterior air is free to circulate through the wall between the brick and celotex. This house is 60 years old. No weep holes. My thought is to block off the air at each end of the 18 foot wall, leaving the gap (dead air space) between the brick and celotex to be heated as any other interior wall. We are located in a semi desert climate at 6000 feet above sea Level. Moisture should not be a problem. Average annual rainfall less than 10 inches.

Hope this clarifies what I'm thinking of and why. Does that change your thoughts?
 
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Old 10-28-19, 08:13 AM
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Yes that does clarify things. In that case, blocking the air gap at the point it turns into interior wall would make sense. I would probably drill a vertical line of 3/8" holes through the mortar joints and inject them with a foam gun.
 
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Old 11-06-19, 07:33 PM
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Thanks

I took your advice and did exactly what you said.
 
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Old 11-06-19, 07:36 PM
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Hope it works out well for you then!
 
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