Exterior tiled patio

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Old 02-13-20, 11:25 AM
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Exterior tiled patio

Portions of our roof are are flat and one such area has been made into a patio by a previous owner. The patio is covered with 18" porcelin tile. Under the patio we have a bedroom which has always felt a little 'damp'. I'm going to guess that the tile was laid around 20 years ago. Our house is solid cement.

This week we had some weird weather. Last weekend it was so cold we could have started a fire. Yesterday it was so hot you would be burnt if you worked outside for very long. At one point yesterday the tiles upstairs started popping/cracking off the roof. At first we couldn't figure out where the noise was coming from.

So now I'm faced with yet another unscheduled home improvement project.

What decisions come into play when it comes to tiling over an existing tile 'floor' versus starting from scratch (removing all the existing tile/glue) ? In our case, I always felt there were hollow areas under the tile which may have allowed rainwater to seem down. If I were to tile over, I would very likely apply a couple coats of waterproof paint over the tile roof first.




 
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Old 02-13-20, 12:43 PM
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So to clarify, are you inquiring about floor tiles or roof tiles?
 
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Old 02-13-20, 12:52 PM
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Ceramic floor tiles applied to a flat roof. The roof is maybe 6-8" thick (reinforced) concrete.

This particular area is maybe 20 X 20 ft.

Perhaps I can put my question in a different light. We also have a small tiled dome (like you would see on a church). It also is about 20 ft in diameter. It leaks. The tiles are like 4 X 4 inches. I was thinking of leaving the tiles in place, slapping on some waterproofing paint, then some new cement (with waterproofing) and later re-tile on top.
 
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Old 02-13-20, 02:28 PM
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You mentioned you thought there was a hollow area under the tile. Now that it's popped loose have you looked underneath to see what you've got?

As for the moisture in the bedroom I suspect water has long been getting under the tiles and soaking into the concrete. I've never seen a waterproofing layer being installed so I assume your roof is just concrete. If the water can't run off or evaporate in a reasonable time it will soak into the concrete and come out the other side as water vapor.

You mentioned a tiled dome. Are the tiles on the inside or outside on the roof?
 
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Old 02-13-20, 05:16 PM
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Regardless of the application, there is really no situation where it's advisable to tile over existing tile!

That's like putting carpet over carpet!

Tile is wholly dependent on a solid, level. secure, waterproof structure, nothing good is going to come to a leaking, cracked, hollow ceiling/floor tile job by slapping another layer of tile on it!
 
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Old 02-20-20, 03:34 PM
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Today I hand-chisled off 99% of the ceramic tiles from the roof. Took about 5 hours. Some areas were easier than others. In some cases the tiles almost popped off with no effort. But the only thing I have removed is the tile itself. The thinset is yet to be removed, and in some of the most difficult places I think the tile was actually applied with grey cement. There were some 'hollow' areas under the tiles where to my novice eye the installer didn't use enough thinset to begin with.

Next question(s). (1) Is it possible to apply cement (or maybe another level layer of thinset) on top of the current thinset - sorry if my laziness is too obvious, but I am an old man. (2) I've been looking at Amazon for an electric tool that might come in handy (I'm partial to Dewalt). I saw this thing called a "rotary hammer drill" but after seeing the pictures of the guy wearing a hardhat doing demolition work - I am not interested in starting a construction company. Can anyone make a suggestion of a smaller tool that might make sense ?

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-21-20, 07:43 AM
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I use a rotary hammer to remove mortar and thinset. It's a step larger than a hammer drill and will accept wide chisel bits and you can set it to hammer only.

 
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