Beginner level help with repainting deck steps

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Old 07-16-20, 02:10 PM
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Beginner level help with repainting deck steps

I've been in my newer build spec home now for 6 years. The front deck stairs are a mix of I believe treated wood and Trex. The step tops are Trex, the vertical sides are I believe painted wood. This side of the home gets quite a bit of afternoon sun.

Attached are some photos of the paint now peeling off the vertical sides of the steps. I've never done external painting, so I was wondering what the steps would be to refresh this?

1. Power wash some of the dirt off?
2. Use a spatula to scrape off the peeling section only?
3. Does it need some sort of primer?
4. The builders left some of the left over exterior paint in our storage room. Can I just mix that paint and reuse it?
5. On the last photo, the wood board surface feels like it's split and a small wood piece is lifting off. Do I just rip it off and repaint that surface?

I appreciate any guidance.


Flaking paint

Flaking paint

Center paint about to flake and peel

Here it looks like the wood surface is starting to split as this is not just a paint chip
 
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Old 07-16-20, 03:09 PM
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Hmm. I dont know what that material is, but I dont think it's real wood. If it is, it's likely fingerjointed rough cedar. And the way the nails are rusting (cedar is corrosive unless you use hot dipped galvanized, ceramic coated or stainless steel fasteners) and the chips you mentioned, I wonder if you would be better off replacing it with something that is composite. (Trex fascia for example) You could screw it on with composite screws.

You "could" tear off what is on there, or if you dont feel comfortable doing that, you could put the new fascia on right over the top of it. You would use composite screws.

If you do decide to paint it, you would be wise to prime it with an oil based primer (or if the tree huggers banned it where you live, try Kilz Premium) to cover up any tannin bleed and rust from the nails. Then any 100% acrylic exterior paint will work for the topcoat. If the old paint is still good you will be able to tell when you open the can and mix it. First you would scrape and repair any damaged areas with a painters putty.
 
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Old 07-16-20, 04:51 PM
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So what type of paint did they use?

The wood, or what ever it is looks to be in pretty good condition, other than the one spot

A good clean up, prime of the bad spot and reuse what you have might be a good option
 
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Old 07-17-20, 02:39 AM
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You definitely want to start with a good cleaning. Once dry, scrape/sand as needed. I'd countersink the rusty nails and fill them with painter's putty or window glazing. Oil prime as needed and top coat with your choice of exterior paint. The leftover paint would likely be fine.
 
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Old 07-17-20, 08:35 PM
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Thanks everyone who chimed in.

I power-washed the boards which cleaned off much of the dirt and also helped identify spots where the paint was about to flake off. After it dries a bit, I will spatula off the flaky paint and apply the Kilz Premium primer suggested.


After power-wash

There were 2 buckets of this color paint left by the builders. The labels are actually a bit different--can anyone decipher them if they are indeed 2 formulations, and which to use? It looks like one is Sherwin Williams' A-100 formulation, the other is their Duracraft formulation. Also, I thought paint was either latex or acrylic, but apparently there are hybrids?




Yes, the surface is definitely a wood product, though hard to say what kind. A lot of the front and back porch is the same painted wood product (see far sides of the picture).


 
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Old 07-17-20, 09:50 PM
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Looks to me like both colors were used on your siding, not on your step risers. Why, I can't say. Maybe he did 1st coat with one and 2nd coat with the other... they were bought 6 weeks apart. Hard to say.

Duracraft is a commercial low price paint... and with that comes lower quality, and basically no warranty.

A-100 is a better quality commercial low price paint that at least has a 15 year warranty. Assuming your 7 year old paint is still good, I would stir it and strain it and after you spot prime and putty, use the A-100 if you like that Khaki color on your step risers. But as I said, it think they used something else on the step risers entirely.

I would pour the Duracraft on some old carpet and let it dry before throwing it in the garbage.
 
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Old 07-18-20, 12:35 AM
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Really appreciate the insight on the paint types.

Yes, that is something I noted about the color. There were 3 exterior paints left over: the Relaxed Khaki (SW 6149), a darker Quiver Tan (SW 6151), and a Roycroft Pewter (SW 2848). As far as I can see, the exterior of the home only has 3 colors. (Though I guess it's possible they had another color they didn't have any left over of).

The first floor siding is definitely the darker Quiver Tan. The Pewter is grey/blue and is used for the column shingles and on the second floor. The door frame and window frames look like the Relaxed Khaki, and I think the porch fence is the same. It does look quite a bit lighter though than the online paint color sample, even reviewing photos from the initial sale 6.5 years ago.

I'll make a test application somewhere to see how the color compares.


 
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Old 07-18-20, 03:36 AM
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I would pour the Duracraft on some old carpet and let it dry before throwing it in the garbage
It would be better to add sand to the bucket of paint and leave the lid off until it dries out before tossing.

I don't recall ever using Duracraft. A-100 is decent paint [used to be their best exterior paint] If you buy new paint I'd recommend stepping up to their SuperPaint line.
I will spatula off the flaky paint
Most of us use a putty knife
 
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Old 07-19-20, 07:10 PM
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Done... I think!

Hi everyone,

I opened the bucket of A-100 Relaxed Khaki paint and it was still good after mixing. Probably 1.5-2 gallons left of the 5 gallon original tub. I confirmed it was the original color of the step risers.

After applying the primer in the problem spots and letting it dry, I then brushed the paint onto the areas that needed touchups.

Then after letting it dry for half a day in the baking sun... I realized it looked just awful! Like some amateur thought he could just dab on new paint onto old paint and have it blend right in (i.e. the exact truth).

So, for round 2, I used a small roller and re-painted all 7 riser boards.



I think it looks fairly good (painter's tape still to be removed)! Hopefully will last another 5+ years.
 
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Old 07-20-20, 02:25 AM
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Looks good!
It's best to remove the tape sooner rather than later. Paint is prone to seep under tape and if it did, the sooner you get to it the easier that paint would be to remove.
 
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Old 07-20-20, 09:48 AM
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Thanks for that last tip.

A lot of lessons with this project to carry onto the next! For example, I will use wider painter's tape next time. The 1" strip was barely sufficient for this purpose!
 
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