Help with Patio Cover drawings for Permit application


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Old 04-12-21, 01:28 PM
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Question Help with Patio Cover drawings for Permit application

I am working to submit a permit with my city for adding a patio cover in my backyard over the existing concrete. I created the drawing needed by them for the various measurements. I will have help to setup the actual patio cover. I dont understand the terminology for the build codes to provide accurate information. I am not a working professional in the industry, so i am reaching out to this forum for help. I have attached the drawing here.

The posts would be attached to the existing concrete via concrete anchors. Do i need to add additional concrete footing? The permit officer has asked for footing size and i dont know what is the answer to that. the note in his review is "MISSING FOOTING SIZES"

the 2nd note is " 2X12 BEAM IS OVER SPANNED". What does that mean? what needs to be changed in the drawing and plan?

Thank you in advance
ashwini





 
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Old 04-12-21, 02:05 PM
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Your asking for help that an architect or structural engineer would provide. Building a deck is pretty straight forward but once you get to overhead construction your plans need to be certified for the approval process!
 
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Old 04-12-21, 02:35 PM
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Many of the details of your roof's construction are covered under the building codes. Keep in mind that it is YOUR job to know the codes. The inspectors job to make sure your construction meets or exceeds the codes and policies for your area. It is not their job to design your structure though they can be very helpful if you are nice and not wasting their time.

I see a number of things wrong or at least suspicious with your drawing:
1. There are no footers underneath your columns. You will need to specify the size and depth
2. How is the ledger attached to the house. Your Inspections Dept. may require a detail of this area calling out fasteners and flashing. This also means you have to know how your current house wall is constructed.
3. Is the structure attached to or touching the house on the left side? If so you'll need to show how that will work.
4. The span for your rafters may or may not be too much depending on your snow loads.
5. Your inspector already noted over spanning your beams.
6. Why two layers of plywood sheeting on the roof (and why are specifying the sheet size)?
7. What is the pitch of your roof. 4:12 is the minimum I like to see with asphalt shingles but you might get away with 2:12. Anything shallower pitch will probably require a different roofing material.
8. Check with your requirements for hold down protection (hurricane straps).
 
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Old 04-12-21, 02:55 PM
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Thank you for your response.

1. There are no footers underneath your columns. You will need to specify the size and depth. Do I need to dig through the concrete to add additional concrete footers? I still dont understand that part. the plan was to attach the posts using anchors. Is that not enough?
4. The span for your rafters may or may not be too much depending on your snow loads. We dont get snow on a regular basis, just occasional.
5. Your inspector already noted over spanning your beams. What does this mean?
6. Why two layers of plywood sheeting on the roof (and why are specifying the sheet size)? 2 layers so the nails for the shingles and anything else are not exposed from below.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 05:10 AM
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1. Yes you will likely be required to install footers.
4. You get snow occasionally so that needs to be accounted for.
5. It means your beams are not properly sized. It is too small to carry the load.
 
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Old 04-13-21, 09:07 AM
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You are also going to have to improve your drawing skills. First thing I saw when I looked at your plans is you have drawn the rafters as if they are lying flat (2" high x 6" wide). That immediately says "this guy doesn't know what he's doing".

Secondly, the roof pitch appears nearly flat, and you don't specify the slope. Yet you plan to use shingles. That's another clue.

And pretty much any carpenter would know that a 2"x12"x16' would not be adequate (would sag) if it held up a heavy roof. Heck, it would eventually sag if it only held up itself!

If all these things are readily apparent to a home handyman, imagine what a building inspector must think.

So, imagine how carefully they're going to look the next time you apply! My recommendation is to have a professional design it and apply for the permit, as well as a competent carpenter to build it.
 

Last edited by I Mullins; 04-13-21 at 09:22 AM.
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Old 04-13-21, 09:53 AM
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My recommendation is to have a professional design it and apply for the permit
So I stated the same, and after reading the responses I also encourage the OP to seek some help, the money spent on professional plans, probably around $250-$400 would be well worth the investments. Many issues present!
 
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Old 04-19-21, 07:55 AM
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Thank you everyone for your feedback. I have spent the $250 now to get drawings done from a local professional and uploaded it.
 
 

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