5/4 deck board spacing and attaching?

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  #1  
Old 07-25-01, 11:51 AM
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I want to know how many of you leave a space(16 penny) between 5/4 boards (PT)and how many put tight so when they dry there is a small gap. Also, I want to attach the boards from the bottom. Do I need to buy "deckmaster" steel angles or can I simply use 3" long screws put in at a 45 degree angle through the 2x8 joists(16" OC)??? Help, project is ready for 5/4 boards. Also, do I need more than "z" flashing on top of ledger board? This is new construction, vinyl siding to start above the ledger board.
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Old 07-25-01, 12:11 PM
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5/4 spacing

Definately butt them up to each other tight. They will dry and they will shrink to give a gap for drainage.

I believe the deckmaster angles will be much better and keeping the boards from warping than just screws from the bottom. Hopefully someone else will verify, I have never seen just screws from the bottom?

Definately flash the ledger board, making sure that the flashing extends up the wall and under the vinyl as well as over the top of the ledger board.

Good luck

 
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Old 07-25-01, 01:30 PM
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keegan99usa,
You can butt them or space them. My second deck(1994) was spaced with the dia. of nail and is stiil about the same.
In other words, everything still gets stuck between the boards, including cherry seeds from the over-hanging tree.
But this is better than no space at all which will collect all kinds of dirt and be nearly impossible to clean out.
I belive you will run into problems by simply screwing from the bottom. Wood expansion and conraction will be tough on a screw thread hold from underneath.
Have you priced the 'deckmaster', it's sort of expensive.
I want to develop and market a galvanized angle iron for decking. Pre-drilled would be ideal. Or, why not a joist shaped like a 'T' for just what we are looking for.
fred
 
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Old 07-26-01, 02:21 PM
Sopman
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DON'T SPACE.
I did mine a month ago and have a 1/8 gap already.
 
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Old 07-26-01, 03:03 PM
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All,
1/8 inch gap 'already'. Sounds good to me. I suppose it depends if you live in the open or in the woods. I wish my gap was larger than 3/16 or so, then the cherry seeds, poplar seeds, helicopters and all would fall through. I guess it's personal preference.
fred
 
  #6  
Old 08-06-01, 05:20 PM
josh1
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no need for fancy deckmaster brackets

simply sister on treated 2x2s to your joists and screw up through these into your 5/4 deck boards use 2 1/4 inch galv screws

HOpe this helps---------josh
 
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Old 08-07-01, 06:27 AM
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Here's what I ended up doing. I work in a metal fab shop, so I took some 18 gaauge galvanized steel sheared to 2 1/4", bent them to 90 degrees at the 1 inch mark and drilled holes on both legs to go into the 2x8 joists every 8" and two holes into each 5/4 board. I spaced about 1/8" cause the boards were drying about 3 weeks in the sun without much rain. This has worked great! It sure does take a bit of extra time though. If you are going to do the same I suggest leaving the ground below about 4-5' from the deck surface to save on the back! Thanks for you help all!
Keegan
 
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Old 08-07-01, 08:39 AM
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Keegan,
Sounds great. No visible nail or screw heads to worry about. It would have also been good with composite deck boards.
fred
 
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