deck railing posts


  #1  
Old 03-24-02, 05:26 AM
rlombo7
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Post deck railing posts

I am installing the deck railing posts (4x4 posts). They are all notched so that they can easily be installed. However, what do I do with the posts that go on the corners of the deck? If I put them on the end on one side, they'll line up with the others on that side, but it will be 2 inches off for the railing on the perpendicular side. What do I do?
 
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Old 03-24-02, 05:35 AM
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One possible fix would be to mount 2 corner posts, one for each side, several inches from the corner and then miter the rails where they meet at the actual corner.
 
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Old 03-28-02, 12:48 AM
josh1
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You could also custom make corner posts.

Measure the depth of the notch ..typically 1 1/2- 1/34 and get a stock 4x4 cut to your post height

cut the depth out of 2 sides for the notch and across the top..but not the whole depth of the post...

essentially you will be taking a small square out of the post if you know what i mean... that way it can go against the corner without alot of mitering...

as for cutting the top of the square out.. use a skil or jigsaw and watch your depth to make sure you only go the 1 3/4 you want to remove...

Hope this helps---Josh
 
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Old 03-28-02, 09:52 PM
L
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The more notches, the weaker the post. That's why I don't notch mine, at all!! (Thru-bolt the whole 4X4 to the substructure of the deck). I like the_tow_guy's suggestion of simply placing 2 post near the corner and mitering the rails to form the corner.
 
  #5  
Old 03-29-02, 12:06 AM
josh1
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I am guessing they are working with premade posts which are all notched. Notching the 4x4 may reduce shear strength, possibly important on a very high deck...but will actually increase load strength because when someones leaning on your railing.. theres 1 1/2 inch of solid wood directly over the rim joist typically. Of course running support posts "through" the deck is probably the strongest you can get if thats an issue but not always easy to do. I was only trying to offer a "miter less" solution. Even with a compound miter saw as a beginning DIYer angles can be tricky. ---Josh
 
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Old 03-29-02, 06:28 PM
L
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josh1, there are about as many ways to build a deck and attach a railing to it as there are people building decks. There is no one perfect way to do it. Notching out the 1-1/2" and setting the post on the band joist is certainly one option. But rlombo7's question was how to deal with the corners. If the posts are already notched, then that is what he (or she) has to deal with. Setting a post 12" or so from the corner on each side of the deck and letting the rails run into the corner is probably their best option. Assuming that the deck corners are square, cutting a 45 on the end of the rails with a power miter saw isn't that difficult.
 
  #7  
Old 04-01-02, 05:42 AM
texfram
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deck railing posts

why were'nt the posts installed prior to finish?
Post go in right after the joist, or before.
Sounds like you'll have to pull up a few planks and insert the posts "if you want to do it right"... if its less than 3' above ground why bother?
But a railing on any deck makes it look better.
I would never notch a post, because if some 400lb whale gets up there then the whole shibang may fall down.
You can still lag bolt the posts to the sides of the skirt of the deck, if thats what you mean...im seeing that maybe you have a noseing on the planks and thats why u want to notch the 4x's.
If thats the case... cut around the outside plank with a jigsaw and lag bolt the 4x's in.
For $500 i will travel.....LOL
 
  #8  
Old 04-01-02, 07:15 AM
texfram
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Originally posted by josh1
I am guessing they are working with premade posts which are all notched. Notching the 4x4 may reduce shear strength, possibly important on a very high deck...but will actually increase load strength because when someones leaning on your railing.. theres 1 1/2 inch of solid wood directly over the rim joist typically. Of course running support posts "through" the deck is probably the strongest you can get if thats an issue but not always easy to do. I was only trying to offer a "miter less" solution. Even with a compound miter saw as a beginning DIYer angles can be tricky. ---Josh
Josh1 ,the miter joints as they all them up north are elementary,
and you dont need all that getup to cut them....you want them to fit right, but its really simple..WITHOUT A COMPOUND SAW.
Put the rail members up on the posts and overlap the corners... then cut thru both 2x members at 45% or what ever.. with the cheesiest circular saw you can find.... it wont cut thru both boards, but it will leave a kerf that you can follow on the underlying piece...cut that then, you have a perfect fit every time.
Intill it shrinks...then you just have to get over it.
Wood shrinks against the grain, so if you're really smart you will leave the long point open about 1/8.. then you just adjust it as it shrinks....yankees dont put much thought into building...but i was happy to give you a tip.
Leaveing the long point open comes with general knowledge... so i dont believe i will go thru all that.
 
  #9  
Old 04-11-02, 09:09 AM
ciccotelli
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I just finished the exact post installation your describing. I notched the corner post so that it sits flush with the ledger on both sides. This will make your railings all meet square. The notch was interesting and since I was using cedar I practised the cut on an aold 4x4 post I had laying around. Notching at the corners leaves about 2x2 material reamining used to secure the post to the ledger. I predrilled and used 3/8 lag bolts on both sides of the ledger.
 
 

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