deck

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-20-02, 11:10 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,162
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
deck

hello
is it usually true that a free standing deck does not have to conform to any codes?
does this sound reasonable: a 12x12 deck with footings a foot deep(maryland) and 6 feet apart with 2x8 beams on them and 2x4 joists upon them?
thanx for your time and keep up the good work
peterr-are all of you volunteers, may i ask, and if so, how do you become one?-thanx again
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-20-02, 02:59 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
A deck has to conform to building codes, and has to be built so that it is structurally sound. Whether it needs a permit or not has to do with your local building requirements, NOT whether it is free-standing or not.

In Maryland, you are dealing with very cold temps. in the winter. That means you will have to sink the footings below the frost line. Pretty sure 12" won't get it. From what I have seen in these forums, your frost line requires that the footings be something around 42" deep.

Sorry, but a 2X8 is not a beam. At the minimum, your beams need to be a 4X. I generally use a 4X6, with the footings or pier blocks spaced 5' apart. And 2X4's are not sufficient for the joists. I use a minimum 2X6 joists. Depends on how far apart the beams are, and how far apart the joists will be placed.
 
  #3  
Old 04-21-02, 02:01 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,162
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
replan deck

hi lefty
i'm off to the building dept with more realistic figures in mind but i have the general idea with 4x's on footings about 5' apart and 2x6's on top of those -footings approx 42".
thanx for the time
peterr
 
  #4  
Old 04-22-02, 06:12 PM
demoman
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Actually you may be surprised when you visit your building department. I recently built a freestanding deck in the Joliet, Illinois area and the building inspector required the posts to be at least 24" deep. The deck was 2-tier, 12'x8' and 22'x12'. I actually sunk the posts 36", with 2" pea gravel on bottom and one bag of dry concrete per 4 posts. Two winters and the deck is still as level as the day I built it. (Yes, I check it).

The reason it needs to be sunk in the ground at all is to protect it from being blown over from strong wind gusts, which can happen in this area.

In my opinion (experience), deck posts rise and fall in the ground, due to freezing, at an equal rate. Which is why attached decks need to be below the frost line. The house doesn't move therefore the deck cannot move.

All your post sizes, beam sizes, joist sizes, on center spacing, deck board size, railings, stairs need to meet code with either design. These dimensions can be found in any inexpensive deck building book.
 
  #5  
Old 04-22-02, 07:11 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,162
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
good idea

i appreciate the time you took to advise me and it was interesting to hear about your deck. i am going to get a deck book and layout my project for the boys at the town hall.
as usual it is always nice to visit this forum and keep up the good work with us novices.
peterr
 
  #6  
Old 04-22-02, 08:19 PM
demoman
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
We were all novices at some point. Heck, I'm still learning. If I were a pro I'd be doing it professionally. However, my goal is to be a custom home builder, so I try to learn as much code and design as possible.
 
  #7  
Old 04-23-02, 04:39 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 2,162
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
novices

at 63 i'm just glad to be able to get out of bed but i'll keep trucking and have a good one
peterr
 
  #8  
Old 04-24-02, 07:38 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Arlington, WA
Posts: 9,238
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
demomam, I have a bone to pick with your building inspector! He should not require that the wood posts be embedded in concrete. They are gonna rot! What he should have suggested was that you use an embedded post base, such as a Simpson EPB44, and put that in the concrete. Then, the post would be attached to the base, but the wood would be an inch above the concrete. If it's not too late, I would call him (or her) back and suggest this change.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description: