deck finishing


  #1  
Old 04-26-02, 09:39 AM
rael
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deck finishing

I must be doing something wrong. Every spring, the stain on the sections of my cedar deck that gets the most sunlight vanishes.The shaded areas look great. So every spring, I buy the most expensive stain strippers, and sun protective deck stains and sealers and go to work for days following all instructions to the letter. Is it unreasonable for me to expect better than one midwestern season of performance from these products? Or am I missing an important step in the process? I can't believe everyone goes through this year after year. What do they do/use on boats or at country clubs in the south? What would be the most common error or omission in the process that might explain this recurring peeling of stain that appears to be directly proportional to the ammount of sun exposure the deck gets?
 
  #2  
Old 04-28-02, 10:40 AM
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rael,
Your key word was 'peeling'. Most all film-based, whether latex or acrylic, solid stains will eventually peel, due to the moisture absorbed by the wood. I use oil-base stains. Oil base stains won't peel, since they are absorbed into the wood. A few good ones are Sikkens, Cabots, and Wolman F&P. These all repel water and offer some UV protection. Consumers Report rates these for three to four years service.
And believe me, marine spar urethanes are a must to avoid on horizontal surfaces. That's one reason wooden boat owners are always working on thier boats.
If you strip the previous peeling stain, and apply one of the above, you wil get much better service time. If you have any other questions, please get back with us.

fred
(Deck-Kleen Powerwashing)
 
  #3  
Old 05-07-02, 08:35 AM
mhpoole
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rael

I have been using penofin for 4 years now, i restore decks for a living, the product i use is penofin. I have customers that are in heavily wooded areas (oregon) and there deck is exposed to the elements all year around, and the deck still looks the same a year later. i think your problem might be in the removal and reapplication of the new stain. please visit my site at www.waterworksnw.com and post your questions on my message board. you can also check out all of our deck pictures they look great.

Mark Poole
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-02, 01:20 PM
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Rael,
Penofin is a fairly good stain for a deck, however it is rated poor for mildew resistance.
If you would like a copy of the Consumers Report on deck stains, send me a private message with your email address and I'll send you a copy of the report.
fred
 
  #5  
Old 05-07-02, 01:21 PM
pmg
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I'm not a painter but doing masonry for 15 years has taught me to thoroughly clean any surface that needs a new coat,be it paint,stain or cement.Bonding works best with a properly prepped surface.This may not be your problem,but something to keep in mind.Good luck.
 
  #6  
Old 05-07-02, 02:32 PM
mhpoole
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I live in Oregon one of the wettest states around, i have never had a problem with mildew with penofin, my guess is he will try to sell you his type of stain, penofin can be bought at home depot
 
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Old 05-07-02, 03:12 PM
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mhpoole,
I'm not trying to sell anything, not even my own deck restoration business. I have already recommended the three best deck stains available. And you can add TWP as a fourth.
They have all been rated for the consumer.
And as far as HD or Lowe's deck stain products go, just look at their aisles: Thompsons, Behr, Olympic, and some others. A couple of the most inferior products for the home owner. But good for repeat sales. In the long run, probably good for your business and mine. Go to a quality paint store for a quality deck stain.
fred
 
  #8  
Old 05-19-02, 04:46 PM
mhpoole
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Well take it from someone who restores decks for a living. PENOFIN or READY SEAL are the only stains you should use, anything else and you will be redoing your deck next year.

Take it from the pro's, or goto a professional deck message board and they will tell you the same thing.
 
  #9  
Old 05-19-02, 06:33 PM
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Mark,
As I said earlier, Penofin is an acceptable product. I also do decks for a living. Ready Seal is a localized product, and not available in the SE. I'm not going to pay a premium for shipping when there are other excellent products available. I've been to all the other deck forum boards before and every other person there wants to sell me the greatest product in the world. Most of the 'professional deck cleaners' know very little about the wood they are trying to restore. And many of them have walked into Lowes/HD and bought a cheap PW - now they are 'professionals'.
My high pressure 100' hose reel cost nearly half what they paid for a PW. Another example - they say "sealing a deck" - well, that's an impossibility. I've been a woodworker for over thirty years, and you cannot seal a piece of outdoor wood already affixed to a deck.
Regards,
fred
 
 

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