Paint color question(s)


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Old 05-09-06, 07:01 PM
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Paint color question(s)

We just purchased a home that we are updating - i.e. removing 70s wallpaper from every room in the house and painting. Questions are to help in the flow of the paint colors through the house. Entryway has ceramic tile floor - mix of light and dark browns and tan. To the left is the LR, then DR through an opening, then to the right of the DR is the kitchen. All white trim through the house. LR has cherry end and accent tables, DR has oak table and china cabinet. Carpet in LR/DR is off-white. Kitchen has camel colored ceramic tile floor with wainscotting half way up wall and behind the dark oak cabinets.

Original thoughts are to paint entry way a light color ("silk mist" Porter Paint), then a darker shade of same in LR. DR and kitchen are the holdup - would like something bold in DR (red or gold?), but still want it to flow into the kitchen. The wainscot in kitchen is a pine color and I had thought to paint it a lighter shade of gold to contrast with the oak cabinets, but what to paint the top of the kitchen walls?

I had wanted to have chair rail in DR and paint 2 different colors, but the view from the kitchen into the DR would have 2 colors in kitchen and 2 in DR - didn't think that would work - agree? The overall look we want is modern, clean, crisp.

ANy ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks
 
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Old 05-10-06, 10:55 AM
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if you're wanting a clean & crisp modern style, you probably don't want a chair rail, or even the wainscoting for that matter. but since it's there already, i'd paint it white like all your other trimwork. you might even want to paint your cabinets and begin phasing out your oak pieces. i can't say as i've seen too many modern spaces with oak furnishings. it's usually mostly painted pieces or very darkly or lightly stained wood with little woodgrain.

and no, you don't really want 2 adjacent rooms to each have 2 colors, unless they share the same top or bottom color.

you seem to be trying to pull colors out of the air ("maybe red or gold"). plan for a color scheme that's based on something - your upholsteries or draperies or artwork or rugs, etc. that's how the colors will tie together from room to room. for example, if you have a little rug in the kitchen with red, gold & green in it, then pull out the gold for the walls in there and use red as an accent, and then use the red in the dining room on the walls. having little touches in one room of the adjacent room's main color ties them together. but don't get too mixy-matchy or it won't be clean & modern. you want to stay primarily monochromatic (shades & tints of the same color) with just accents of color highlighting important things. look at catalogs from modern styled catalogs/websites for ideas. Pottery Barn is a great one.
 

Last edited by Annette; 05-10-06 at 11:12 AM.
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Old 05-12-06, 06:57 AM
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Consider the sunlight in the room

Look at how the light reflects in the room and which direction it comes from. South and West window room look best in cool colors, like greens and blues. North and East window rooms look good in warmer colors, like yellows and reds.

If you already have a color scheme with a favorite piece, use the accent color that best fits the direction. Brighten up and/or add richness to the room with metels (bronze, gold or chrome) that best fits your style and color scheme. Consider spary painting hardware or light fixtures to better match your colors.

Remember, things come back in full circle. What is "out of style" today may be back in a year or two. Keep original tile and special effects, camofloging them with material, rugs, etc. until they are popular again.
 
 

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