Best Paint clean-up


  #1  
Old 01-26-08, 11:40 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 109
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Best Paint clean-up

This is sort of an opinion question since we are becoming more aware of how our actions affect our environment. I have been doing my own painting for years, and I was wondering what everyone thinks is the best way to clean up after using latex paint. We know how much water it takes to really clean a good roller, or even a good paintbrush, so I've been just buying less expensive rollers and throwing them out after using, since it seems its worse to use that much water over adding to the landfill with a dried out roller. Most of my brushes, especially if I like them, I try to clean. What does everyone else think?
Suzy
 
  #2  
Old 01-28-08, 08:28 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,047
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
If I run out of energy and/or time, I place the roller in a plastic bag and refrigerate. When, the project is done, I toss the roller. Rollers tend not to cost that much, even high quality, and I tend not to have time to spend for washing or salvaging.

Time is more valuable, and, as you indicate, water conservation is important. I also use tray liners so I do not have to wash paint tray. Professional painters tend not to use a paint tray, preferring a 5 gallon plastic bucket with paint grid for rolling the paint roller. I am little and old and stick to my old techniques which I have used in many rental and owned residences. You you can, however, scrape paint roller with putty knife into paint bucket or 5 gallon bucket and wash/rinse or save for future use.

When it comes to buying paint brushes and rollers and paint, one should buy the best quality available. This will tend to assure the best paint quality application.
 

Last edited by twelvepole; 01-29-08 at 09:34 AM.
  #3  
Old 02-26-08, 01:13 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 48
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
save & toss

I save my brushes, rollers and trays in plastic bags until I know I'm done with the job. I don't put them in the refrigerator because refrigerators dry out food, why wouldn't they dry out paint? And who has the room? When I'm done with the job I wash out good brushes, toss rollers and let paint dry in the paint pan, then I peal it off and toss it away. It peals out of the plastic trays very easily after it's completely dry.

My Home Depot sells a more environmentally friendly paint, I'm going to try some next time I paint.
 
  #4  
Old 02-26-08, 01:45 PM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,809
Received 872 Upvotes on 763 Posts
A brush or roller cover wrapped in plastic will be good for a day or two at room tempature but the same brush/roller will last a lot longer when stored in cool temps - like a refridgerator.


"My Home Depot sells a more environmentally friendly paint"

I assume this is a low or no VOC paint which has to do with air pollution - clean up is still the same.
 
  #5  
Old 02-26-08, 02:38 PM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,211
Received 1,287 Upvotes on 1,225 Posts
I like to let mine soak in water a little rather than just rinsing under running water. Seems like I use less water overall that way.
 
  #6  
Old 03-14-08, 01:27 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,126
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I sandwich the brush between several sheets of newspaper/junk mail, press it to the floor with heel of palm, and drag it out. Repeat until paper comes clean.

I rather the paint dries and moulders in a landfill than flows down the river. Though honestly I reckon latex paint should be the least of our worries. Not very toxic. I could probably digest a spoonful of latex without feeling ill. Contrast the noxious fumes produced in mining, smelting, and forming one ordinary steel paint can. Can we please have it in bags already?

Brush squeezed out, I then wriggle it in a small volume of water, which will stand and evaporate somewhere out of the way.

The residue I wash in any sink, down the drain. A little dishsoap before the final rinse, and use the clean brush itself to wipe around the sink.

Is there a tool for squeezing paint off rollers?
 
  #7  
Old 03-14-08, 04:22 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 45,809
Received 872 Upvotes on 763 Posts
A painter's 5in1 tool [funny looking putty knife] is designed to scrape wet paint off of the roller.

Back when I was an apprentice, I heard the old timers talk about when paint came in a sack - you had to add your own solvent to mix the paint to a usable form. I wouldn't want to go back to those days!
 
  #8  
Old 03-14-08, 09:52 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,126
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Me neither, but *oops there goes another patent* re-sealable bag affixed in cardboard box/holder could be superior to our current round tins in every way.

...

Ah yeah now I remember the 5-in-1, thanks for jogging memory.

 
  #9  
Old 04-24-08, 09:09 AM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,085
Received 33 Upvotes on 27 Posts
I use saran wrap for brushes and rollers when I have to take a break during painting. Wrapped tightly, it makes a good seal. I have left rollers this way for a week without a problem.

I guess I'm destroying the world because I rinse my brushes under an outdoor hose bib. Lots of water until the brush is perfectly clean. The water goes directly into the ground where it came from so I haven't been too concerned.

Seriously, I'm sure that in some areas the gallon or two used to rinse a brush may be of concern, but for most of us water and water use is not an ecological concern.
 
  #10  
Old 04-24-08, 10:42 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,047
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Upvotes on 2 Posts
Those disposable grocery bags with which we are inundated come in handy for wrapping paint brushes and rollers. It's a good idea to keep a few around if you have painting projects on your to-do list. The bags also come in handy for disposal of rollers, kitchen waste, pet waste, and other yucky items generated by the household.

Where water is a premium, it is important to conserve. At my mountain cabin where there is a small spring, every drop is precious. I haul water from the river for cleaning brushes, scrubbing the deck or screened in porch, and projects that do not require potable water.
 
  #11  
Old 04-24-08, 12:55 PM
W
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,085
Received 33 Upvotes on 27 Posts
I used to have a hunting cabin that did not have running water. At the back of the lot there was a small pipe driven between some rocks into a spring. It provided enough water for drinking. We also hauled water in buckets - from a nearby stream.

After a couple of years (and a minor skunk incident) my wife decided no more outhouse for her. She would have indoor plumbing. I had a guy drive a shallow well and put in a pump where the spring was. We ended up with more water than we could use. It was only 20-30 feet down.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: