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Tearing out and replacing old tile bathroom floor

Tearing out and replacing old tile bathroom floor


  #1  
Old 07-27-02, 07:22 PM
Boogman
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Tearing out and replacing old tile bathroom floor

I have a small bathroom maybe 8' x 10' The floor is 20 year old octagon shaped tile which is cracked in 3-4 places and stained.

The wood underneath has a rotted section about the size of a basketball which is probably responsible for the cracks in the tile.

I want to tear out all the tile and replace the wood underneath then go back with linoleum and also replace the toilet.

Here's my problem.... The walls of the bathroom are also tile from 4 feet up all the way to where it meets the tile on the floor. I want to keep the tile walls but how do I break loose the floor tile without chipping or breaking the wall tile?
 
  #2  
Old 07-27-02, 07:47 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
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Tearing out and replacing old tile bathroom floor

Boogman,

My experience in remods should help you out here. Depending on what you have for tools here's my suggestion and hopefully others may give additional hints.

Once you have removed your fixtures from the bathroom, remove the ceramic tiles up to within the cove base. (NOTE: this is if the tile is under the cove base) If you can is under the base, carefull try and chip or pry them out. If you have some 1/8" or 1/4" underlayment, cut some strips about 6 inches high and tape this to the wall starting at the curve of the cove base. This is to protect the wall. If the tile installation is where the floor is flush with the wall tile, no cove base, then the process will be easier. I am assuming that this was placed in thin set not a mortar base, right?

Using a circular saw, cut the flooring with the blade present for underlayment depth only and use the blade guide as a means to get close to the wall but not touch the wall tiles. If you have sawzall, with a short metal blade, carefully cut the remaining sections that the circular could not reach. Alternative tools for trying to get close is the RotoZip but most folks have at least a circular saw. If not, and it is time consuming is to use a sharp wood chisel and remove the remaining wood. I would leave the remaining wood perimeter and butt your new underlayment to it.

Hope the ideas help!
 
  #3  
Old 07-27-02, 08:02 PM
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One more Idea!

Boogman,

Old age is getting the best of me....Check out your local tool rental store. Ask to rent a Toe-Kick Saw!! This will solve all your problems with destroying everything and teh saw comes with a 3/4" preset depth setting. Still use the underlayment to protect your wall tiles just in case. This may be the ticket to do what you want. I forgot all about it! Sorry

Good Luck!
 
  #4  
Old 07-27-02, 08:04 PM
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Can't Spell!!!

Boogman,

(corrected spelling)

Old age is getting the best of me....Check out your local tool rental store. Ask to rent a Toe-Kick Saw!! This will solve all your problems without destroying everything and the saw comes with a 3/4" preset depth setting. Still use the underlayment to protect your wall tiles just in case. This may be the ticket to do what you want. I forgot all about it! Sorry

Now I'm happy!
 
 

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