squeeky bath tub


  #1  
Old 09-03-02, 12:41 PM
Jenifer123
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squeeky bath tub

I have started to notice lately that when I stand in the shower, the center of the tub squeeks and the tub floor seems 'mushy' (the outer edges of the tub floor feel firm). I have one of those one piece deep soaking tubs with an overhead shower with glass doors. The tub is (I think) plastic. The condo I own is nearly 7 years old. I've been standing on the floor edges of the tub when I shower avoiding the center, but I'd like to get it fixed before it becomes a major problem. Upon inspection today, I just noticed that the faucet is not caulked to the wall and I'm wondering if maybe water has gotten in there and I have wood rot on the tub frame work? Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions for me. If I do have wood rot, how complex is it to have fixed? Would I need a plumber or a contractor to remedy this?
Thanks for any input or advise you can offer me!
Jen
 
  #2  
Old 09-03-02, 04:29 PM
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squeeky bath tub

Jen,

Not knowing exactly what is going, you may have some leaking going on. If you have an access panel in which to see the bottom of the tub/shower you may be able to check for damp areas. Get a flashlight and run just the tub water first and see if anything drips from the access panel side. If not, turn the shower on and again check the access panel area for drips or leaks. You may have a leak at the tub drain but usually these fall below and don't damage the subfloor. Try and feel all the fittings, drain and water supplies for any sign of problems. If we are talking about some leaking, most repairs can be made without tearing out anything, so this would mean a plumber for repairs. Having no caulk on the faucet handles could be a problem but if you do as I mentioned above, you may see evidence of leaking.

If the issue is not one of leaking but just movement, then do as I posted above. As with the posting I just made on tubs, some tub/shower bases require some type of support to prevent flexing, mortar or joint compound. I doubt that anyone provided a good support under the deep tub when it was installed. I realize that this may mean tear out and replacement but this would resolve your issues. From a budget standpoint, this may mean simply to put up with the noise and flexing until something happens. Again a plumber would be called to resolve the issues. This would be more expensive than the leaking issue.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 09-03-02, 06:52 PM
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Doug, correct me if I am wrong or if you don't think this would work.
If she has access to the plumbing and the under side of the tub. Could she use some of that expanding foam insulation? Spray it under the tub to take up slack between the subfloor and the bottom of tub. I would think once it cured, it may give it just enough support to prevent the sagging. Sure would be easier than tearing the whole tub out!
 
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Old 09-03-02, 07:06 PM
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Trying2Help,

Problem with the foam is that it does not have the dense consistentcy which would support the weight, especially after getting into the tub the first time.

If you have every tried to squeeze a pc of this after it has cured, it fails to go back to it's original shape thus, the attempt would fail after the first time stepping into the tub.

The only advantage of the foam is to keep the water hotter longer.

It may be possible to try and push joint compound or a mortar mix into the cavity and not use it for a couple of days. This may help but you have to push it in and not try and create many voids, especially any sharp spikes that could create a hole.

I appreciate the thought and I'm sure Jen does to but the foam idea has never worked effectively when weight is applied to it.

Sorry
 
  #5  
Old 09-04-02, 01:30 PM
Jenifer123
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Thanks Guys :-)

Thanks for all of your advice and input. Unfortunately there is no access panel on the tub, it seems to be one big unit. To check the pipes and things would mean tearing out the tub and the glass shower doors. I checked the ceiling in the garage (tub sits over the garage of my condo) and there seems to be no water damage or leaking showing, so maybe its just poorly installed as you indicated? Can I ask another dumb question of you guys (sorry, no man in my life!!) Should I go ahead and caulk around the faucet and just live with the mushy feeling - I'm thinking maybe no water damage yet- always positive thinking ?
Thanks so much for your input.
Best regards
Jen
 
  #6  
Old 09-04-02, 02:03 PM
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Re: Thanks Guys :-)

[QUOTE]Originally posted by Jenifer123
[B]I checked the ceiling in the garage (tub sits over the garage of my condo) and there seems to be no water damage or leaking showing, ....

If this is the case, mayber you can access the plumbing through the crawlspace/attic of the garage? Not many want to venture up there, but if you are up to it, it maybe a way to "see" what is going on.

Yes, I would caulk around all fixtures to prevent any leakage.
 
 

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