Bathtub replacement


  #1  
Old 12-01-02, 01:36 PM
rcox
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Bathtub replacement

Hi...
These may seem like dumb questions, so thanks for your patience.

I want to replace my bathtub. The inside dimension between the two end walls is 58, 7/8" - does this mean that a 60" tub will fit properly?

The tub is 50 years old, but has a much newer 5-piece surround on it. The surround was really poorly installed.

Do the three piece tub-surround-cap installs need drywall behind the surround and cap?

Will I have to tear out all the drywall?

Any advice will be appreciated.

Thanks,

R.
 
  #2  
Old 12-01-02, 02:13 PM
D
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If you're measuring your tub opening from drywall or surround on each end, you probably have 60" from stud to stud which is the correct opening. You probably will have to remove some drywall to remove tub (2-4" from top of tub).
As to your surround it depends on what you buy as to what you will have to do. Some surrounds just glue on to the existing wall board, some are nailed to the studs and edges covered with wall board.
 
  #3  
Old 12-01-02, 05:57 PM
Y
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just to make it easier for you

since your tub will be 3-400 pounds of cast iron, get a 10 lb slege hammer and whack it - it will be easier to carry out
the call a scrap metal guy and thry will take it from your driveway for free-dont pay for it

good luck
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-02, 06:38 PM
rcox
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Thanks folks!

Good advice, thank you.

I'll bash the tub, and I'll see how the drywall behind the crummy surround has survived.

Has anyone ever used something called Barker board for tub surround? It seems kind of like rigid linoleum, comes in 4'x8' or 5'x5' sheets. I can see how it could join fine in the corners with a bead of silicon, but what about edge to edge on the flat?

I'd probably be further ahead just to get a pre-fab surround.

Thanks again.

R.C.
 
  #5  
Old 12-01-02, 06:59 PM
D
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The edge on flat can be finished with caulk. Smooth it out with a wet finger.
 
  #6  
Old 12-01-02, 07:37 PM
Y
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surround?

i have installed the board in a kitchen for backsplash
looks amazing
now for the finished edge, i would suggest tile edging it comes in plastic crome or brass ranging 2-10 bucks a length HD carries them
i think tile board would look nicer than surround

if you do the tile board
use bulldog grip PL 200 with a 3/16 v noch at a 45 angle
apply glue to board - not wall
also use a circ saw to cut put tape on cut line AND tape the entire base of the saw so it wont scratch

hope it helps

now if you want to get adventurous put real tile we will let you know how
 
  #7  
Old 12-01-02, 08:45 PM
rcox
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Great help! Thanks gang.

I don't think I'm going to try the real tile just yet :-) Maybe in the kitchen, one day. I'll stick to the tileboard.

Anything special I do to seal the drywall behind it before using the adhesive?

R.C.
 
  #8  
Old 12-01-02, 08:55 PM
Y
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not needed, but if you might as well prime the top area and put first coat of paint so you dont have to edge as much

keep us informed
 
  #9  
Old 12-04-02, 08:47 PM
rcox
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Angry

A progress report, and a question or two...

So far, so good, knock on wood. I got the cast bathtub out (got $5.25 for it at the metal recyclers ).

The drywall around the tub isn't really drywall. The old guy next door said it's called gyprock lath and plaster. Anyway, it is thicker than regular drywall and seems to have 5 distinct layers:

>>
card or paper (1mm)
white plaster stuff (5mm)
card or paper (1mm)
different brown/sandy looking plaster stuff (5mm)
hard white plaster (2mm)

I'm going to have to shim out the drywall when I replace the 12" or so above the tub that I cut out to let the new tub fit in. Either that or get 5/8 or 3/4 drywall.

The barker board is going to work well. Thanks for the suggestion.

Now I'm fighting with the new tub to get it in right. How important is the mortar bed the instructions say I have to put underneath? What about the 'T' support under the front lip? I made a T and glued it in with the PL 200, but it keeps falling out and I can't figure a way to slide it in after the tub is already almost in place. (the tub is an acrylic/fiberglass one).

The reason I ask about the mortar is that a plumber acquaintance of mine says the only place he uses mortar is under a corner shower stall.

Thanks for your advice so far. Oh yeah the other thing I'm fighting with is the new drain & overflow. I got one that is for deep tubs (this one is 19") but it seems that the bits and pieces that make up the plug piston and lever are too long, even after I use the shortest adjustment holes. Home Depot guy said it would work, so maybe I'm just not getting it.

TTFN,

Rick.

PS. what is a v notch at a 45 degree angle for the adhesive? I get the 45 degree part.
R.
 
  #10  
Old 12-04-02, 09:25 PM
Y
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ok thets give it a go

you should shim out because you need the wall to come down over the tiling flange on the tub-the part that curves back up about 1 inch on 3 sides of tub-do not rest drywall or cement board (recommended )on the tub- you must keep it up 3/16-1/4 inch so water wont wick up if you have a leak.

mortar be?
i think a morter bed is BS but ,if they say to do it for warranty i guess u should , i feel that if the tub sits level on the floor its cool -no bed, i just put a $2000CDN ultra tub in my girlfriends parents house and i did not use bed-but if you want to use one you can use any type of setting compound, and put a thin plastic over topand set tub in and level it VERY WELL, and after it cures u can remove tub to help fit the drain
i called the maker of this tub and they said it wasnt needed, even though the book said so

now i dont understand t support
i think you are talking the supports around 3 sides of the tub
use 2x3 what you do is pull the tub out about a foot and hold the 2x3under the lip where it should be and measure how high, now transfer this to thwewall , repeat for three sides- you should be able to get tub in with the long one and 1 short one in place -screw them or nail.
the third u will have figure out based on your situation
u may want to try "liquid nails"
whew im too tired for another question so take the drain part to HD and tell them to adjust it . if they know how.haha
sry unless i can see it i cant help


the v-notch is a trowel about 5X10
and it has notche in 2 sides of shaped like a "v" this allows the proper amount of glue to go on
2 buck at the depot in the tile area

keep us informed
 
  #11  
Old 12-05-02, 07:37 PM
rcox
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so far so good...

So... a pretty good day, in all.
The new tub is in, seated in a bed of joint compound. Squeaks like hell though, so I must have done something wrong.

The drywall sections went in fine. The shims worked ok to make the edges of the drywall match up to the edge of the existing gyprock plaster stuff.

The barkerboard is up around the tub. Why don't the tub makers make the lips squarish, so that it's easier to cut a proper shape in the surround or barker or tile or whatever? All the curvy bits make my hair grey trying to get a good fit.

I hope the barkerboard sticks up well. I can't stand in there all night putting pressure on it. :-)

Tomorrow - the plumbing part. hopefully I don't burn the house down while I'm soldering the copper. The person who installed the previous faucet did a pretty good job of creating charcoal around the places where the pipes are close to a stud.

The faucet I'm putting in is a Waltec facemount - should be fun trying to guestimate how long the bibbs should be that stick out through the wall. You'd think that the three would all be the same, but no... the hot & cold supply need to be a wee bit longer than the one for the shower. I guess I'll make the bibbs too long and then cut them down after they're in place.

One more trip to Home Depot tomorrow to get some plumber's putty for around the plughole, a wax toilet gasket, and a replacement rubber gasket for below the plug hole - the cat thought it was a mouse or something and chewed it up.

TTFN...
Thanks for all the advice so far.

Rick
 
  #12  
Old 12-09-02, 05:03 AM
rcox
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Talking Phew... all done!

Success!

Well, thanks to all the good advice, the tub replacement project was a reasonable success!

Everything seems to have gone better than I could have hoped for, with the exception of the silicon application around the edges - I'm not the neatest siliconer in the world. But, too much is better than too little, so I hope I've got the edges of the barkerboard truly sealed up.

The facemount faucet works very well.

The tub drain is fully operational, but you have to hold the plug handle open to drain it if there is more than 3 inches of water on it - I guess the weight of the water on the plug is too heavy for the handle to stay open.

As the glue dried the squeaks have gone way down. Still a few creaks and groans, but other than that...

Thanks Doug, yongeman and dirty dan - you've been a great sounding board and advice source.

Rick.
 
  #13  
Old 03-05-03, 02:28 AM
Ancient70sHouse
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Question Re: surround? Bulldog Grip PL 200

Hi Yongeman,

Finally someone addresses tileboard and adhesive.

Years ago (before I married him, hehehe) my husband put up tileboard (barker board?) on the bathroom walls over drywall. He said he used the glue that the paneling place told him to use, but of course cannot remember the brand. I do not want to take down the tileboard as it is a pretty pink pattern that basically looks like tile and is in good shape everywhere. It is not in the tub area (real tile is there and in good shape).

My problem is my husband was very sloppy when putting up the tileboard and there is hardened glue oozing out everywhere (on the flat edges, on the cornerjoints, on the real tile, on the ceiling, on the molding, etc.). All of the glue is a "tan" dirty color and fairly hard. I am assuming it is something like the Bulldog Grip PL 200. What is the best way to remove the excess glue/adhesive? Razor blades works ok on the real tile, followed by using a green scrubby with fabric softener to smooth out the surface, but I am afraid of damaging the tileboard surface with a razor-scraper method.

I have used fabric softener and a green scrubby in some places and it works good if there is not a big build-up, but it is laborious. Lighter fluid doesn't work to good either. I have tried the petroleum jelly trick to no avail.

Will an adhesive remover, mineral spirits, De-Solve-It, etc., hurt the finish of the tileboard? I don't want to cut the nice shine it has? Should I try something like nail polish remover or alcohol?

Any suggestions? It is really caked on in some places. I realize Bulldog Grip is a Canadian product, but this glue must be something similar. How do you remove the excess?

The tileboard must be masonite as it is kind of "hard, hard cardboard" underneath the slick "plastic?" fake square tile surface. I have an extra piece of it and the back is a dark kind of "pressboard?". I don't want to scrape off the fake finish with anything too harse.

Any idea how to remove the old Bulldog...maybe if I get my cats to teetee on it the uric acid will dissolve it !!!

Thanks in advance, and any suggestions would be appreciated as I am tired of looking at the nice walls with goopy glue/adhesive on them. My fingernail works good on some spots, but they are wearing out rapidly!

Peace,
Nancie

Originally posted by yongeman
i have installed the board in a kitchen for backsplash
looks amazing
now for the finished edge, i would suggest tile edging it comes in plastic crome or brass ranging 2-10 bucks a length HD carries them
i think tile board would look nicer than surround

if you do the tile board
use bulldog grip PL 200 with a 3/16 v noch at a 45 angle
apply glue to board - not wall
also use a circ saw to cut put tape on cut line AND tape the entire base of the saw so it wont scratch

hope it helps

now if you want to get adventurous put real tile we will let you know how
 
 

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