American Standard Americast


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Old 01-14-03, 11:35 AM
dnewma04
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American Standard Americast

Does anyone have any opinion about the americast material used on the Amer. Standard Princeton tub? Just curious if I should steer clear of it and stick with cast iron? I like the idea that it is lighter weight and seems to have a much more dead sound to it when putting it through the knuckle rapping test.
 
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Old 01-14-03, 03:04 PM
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dnewma04,

A Michigan neighbor!!

The products that they provide are excellent. Some folks like cast iron, I don't only because they are a pain to put in. Plus they are cold to the touch and heavy!

Americast is made very well but so are other products. It's mixture of an alloy, giving almost the same thickness of a cast iron tub, porcelain finish and some insulated composite, it's not very heavy and does provide the means to keep hot water longer. You're right, it not only seems very solid, it is!.

These are made quite well and when installed properly will last for years!

You'll be pleased!
 
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Old 01-14-03, 05:57 PM
dnewma04
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I work at 9 mile and hoover so i'm not too far away during the day.

Thanks for the feedback, the design certainly seemed to be solid, glad to get someone elses perspective.
 
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Old 01-14-03, 06:10 PM
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dnewma04,

I am at 14 and Crooks - heck, you sure got a drive to work! I just did a large addition on Dickinson Island last year - had to hire a seawall installer to barge over lumber and crane it on the yard! Real Fun!

I'm sure that you'll like the tub - I haven't heard of many complaints and I do have some clients that have this.

Let us know what you think or give me a call!
 
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Old 01-14-03, 06:13 PM
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dnewma04,

Forgot to say, the complaints are because of the plumber not doing his thing right - like solid mortar bed to set the tub on! This makes a difference because the owners had leaking from the drain assembly as well as some flex.
 
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Old 01-14-03, 07:34 PM
dnewma04
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Once everything is installed, I will let you know how it worked out!
 
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Old 01-15-03, 12:58 PM
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Americast tub

I just installed a Americast tub.It has some flex in it.The directions didn't say anything about putting motar or anything under the tub.I wish I would have.
 
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Old 01-15-03, 01:37 PM
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mabergin,

Just sent you an e-mail concerning how to do proper support now after it is already installed. DO NOT USE SPRAY-IN-PLACE FOAM, this is not going to provide the support and is highly flammable.

Mortar or joint compound mix should had been done before hand but when it after the fact, it's hard but acheivable to use joint compound and push this in uder the tub. You do not want any voids or pockets, it should be placed directly under the bottom and make an effort to ensure that the entire bottom is filled. Use whatever means to do this. Once you let it set for a couple of days or less with the help of a small fan, it will be solid - no flex and will not harm the tub. You'll be pleased with the results.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 01-16-03, 10:28 PM
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I've installed two Americast tubs in my house with in the last year. One upstairs on a wood sub floor and one downstairs on a concrete slab. I have no complaints about either. No mortar bed (or any other type) and have noticed no flexing. I supported tub flange with 2 by's on three sides. I used long construction screws and glue to attach flange supports to every available wall stud. When you set the height of the flange supports, tack them up and try the fit first, before you screw them in. I found that the Mfg's measurements were not accurate.
 
 

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