drop in bath tub


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Old 01-16-03, 09:04 AM
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drop in bath tub

Hi all.

I have a question concerning a drop in bath tub. This tub will be free standing on two sides (front and left side). I only have 32" to work with, which also happens to be the width of the bathtub. When building the frame, is it possible to have the tiles flush with the rim of the tub on the front side? On the left side, I do have about 6" extra. The back and right side will be butting up to the studs, however a tiling bead should work to prevent water damage on these sides, am I correct?

Any thoughts on this, are welcome
 
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Old 01-16-03, 10:08 AM
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gschoenmakers,

Am I right in assuming that you are not putting up cement backer board on walls or tub frame?

What you are proposing is not the normal way for a drop in tub but if you are going to do this flush in front with tile, just make sure that front lip and tile are going to meet. This is why I say it is not normal and it makes it very hard to acheive a flush corner, you just don't have any room for play. Normall the tub would be installed after the framing,cement baord and tile was done at least on top. What you are proposing is a "gamble" that you are right on with the thickness of the tile after it is applied with thinset.

No way to gain an extra 2 or 3" inches so that you have front tile placed on top of platform? I hope I am understanding what you are proposing to do.

Just thoughts
 
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Old 01-16-03, 10:30 AM
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drop in bath tub

Actually I am planning to put up backer board on walls and frame. That is why I am wondering whether it wil be possible to have the tiles flush to the rim on the front side. Coming from Europe, where they have the tubs standing on legs, a frame is not necessary. This gives you space to build a thin frame and have the tiles flush to the rim of the tub when finishing. Normally when building a frame, this frame will stick out a couple of inches. I do not have that space. The bathroom is only 8' long with toilet, sink and tub next to eachother. I am wondering whether a thinner frame up front will be okay in order to put up backer board and have the tiles flush with the rim. If the tub is cemented onto the floor, the frame would not have the purpose of keeping the tub in place. Or is there a chance of sagging once the tub is filled? It will be an acrylic tub, Kohler Devonshire soaking tub.

I am aware that going with the alcove version will be easier, it is just that given the fact that I have 6" on the left side, I would have to build a frame on that side, which would have to be somewhat higher than the tub. I thought it would look so much nicer if that extra 6" will be the same hight as the tub, hence the thought of using a drop in tub.
 
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Old 01-16-03, 11:24 AM
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gschoenmakers,

I uderstand what you want to do. I think that you will need the wood frame as this is acrylic and the edges of the tub are not designed for side load stress, however minimal. The cement support under the tub is good but this is not the reason for eliminating a strong frame. The cement is only for tub bottom support. The frame is to provide support for the top lip and allow for your finish applications.

Check out your tubs installation instructions to ensure that if you intend to put in a thin wall frame that it will be solid. I think the finish application will be difficult at best to obtain with what you desire.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 01-16-03, 11:27 AM
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thx Doug.

This is what I feared. I rather not risk it, and I will go with an apron.

Thx again.
 
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Old 01-16-03, 12:00 PM
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gschoenmakers,

Did the instructions give any detailed information on the frame that helped you out? Was I wrong in my assumptions? I didn't mean to make you change your plans. It's just that I have done these and it would be a concern if damage was done over time.

Let me know what you're thinking or found out
 
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Old 01-16-03, 12:27 PM
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Doug, no you did not make me change my mind. I checked the installation sheets, and of course it mentions that the tub should not be supported by the rim, which is to be expected. In any case I do not want to run the risk that I am facing repairs over the coming years because I tried something, I was not so sure of that it would be a solid construction to begin with. Again, if the tub would have been supported the way European tubs are I would not have hesitated, however this is not the case. Although I am open for experiments, this is not one of them. Therefore I am chosing the safe option of buying a tub with apron.

thx, again.
 
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Old 02-17-08, 08:03 PM
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drop in tub 72x42

how do i build a platform
 
 

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