Installing a bath vent


  #1  
Old 01-19-03, 04:32 PM
schong02176
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Installing a bath vent

I'm looking to install a bathroom vent in a second floor bathroom, just below my attic. I believe I can install the fan in the ceiling of the bathroom, run the exhaust pipe in a bay running parallel to the attic floor joists to the exterior wall just below where the roof meets the wall. Here, I'll have to drill a 4 1/4 inch diameter hole to allow the pipe to pass through the wall. This hole will have to pass through a sill plate (not sure of the correct term for this) to which the floor joists for the attic are attached and on which the ceiling rafters are resting. Should I be worried about any structural issues with boring such a large hole through this area?

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 01-19-03, 05:13 PM
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schong02176,

With what you are proposing, cutting through the top plate (part of the second floor wall) is not where you want the hole.

Are you suggesting that you have no soffit? Is the rafters sitting on top of the floor joists within the attic? or on top of the second floor plate? This makes a difference.

If you have a soffit, it depends on how deep they are and the pitch of the roof so you are not drilling a hole in the wrong place. Double check all your measurements to ensure that you are doing this in the right place.

Your hole will probably be within the space above the 2nd flr wall, between the attic floor joists - this is OK but I don't know if this going to get you outside of your exterior or get you inside a soffit.

Check twice...drill once!
 
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Old 01-19-03, 06:47 PM
schong02176
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Doug,

Thanks for the information. I believe you're right...I will be drilling the hole within the space above the 2nd floor wall between attic floor joists. I'll check the dimensions, but if I am going to end up in the soffit, how do I make the transition from a horizonal run through the rim joist to a vertical hole through the bottom of the soffit? The overhang of the soffit beyond the outside wall is quite small, so I'm not sure how to get into that space.

In any event, should I worry about structural issues in drilling through the rim joist in the attic floor?

Thanks
 
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Old 01-19-03, 07:09 PM
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schong02176,

The rim joist that you are referring to is just the blocking between the rafters. No harm in cutting a hole through this, in fact, you could probably take a hammer to it and know it out! It won't cause any problems.

I am wonder though, due to the second floor issue, if you have a aluminum soffit and fascia, you may be able to just run your duct within the soffit and reapply insulation around the duct to prevent heat loss and be done with it. No need to worry about bees and the like as long as everything is sealed. What moisture is exhausted will evaporate quite quickly.

If this is not the case, and you have a wood soffit and no vent is close, you will have to get the tall ladder. Install a vent directly where the duct is located within the soffit, purchase a 90 degree rectangle boot , probably a reducer to attach to the duct hose and just lay this over the new soffit vent. The weight will keep it in place.

Worst case scenario is to install a roof exhaust vent for your bathroom exhaust and install it properly on your roof.

How's this?
 
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Old 01-21-03, 03:42 PM
masterjoe
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Talking Option B

Along with Doug's recommendation, there's another option if it's applicable in your situation. Do you have another bathroom with a exhaust fan?? If so, do you know how its duct is routed to outside?? If the physical distance between two bathrooms are quite close, you can tie your new exhaust duct to the existing one by using a Wye. I've done it in my bathrooms and it makes your life so much easier. Assess your current setup and reply back; we'll help you more.
 
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Old 01-21-03, 06:09 PM
schong02176
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Masterjoe, Doug -

Thanks very much for the assistance. Unfortunately, none of my bathrooms are vented, and my kitchen vent is too far away to tie into it. It makes sense, though, that this option would make life a lot easier.

As for the soffit issue, my soffits are, unfortunately, wood and are not currently vented. So, if the hole through the rim joist puts me within the soffit (I still haven't quite gotten all the measurements worked out to tell), I'll probably have to drill through the soffit as well. I'm a little leery about poking the vent through the roof, mostly because I would like to do this work myself, and don't trust myself to cause a leaky mess in the roof.

As an aside, if I did want to get a professional to do this (probably just running the vent...I think I can handle the electrical and mounting the fan itself), who would I call? A plumber? An electrician? A heating specialist?

Thanks very much for all the help.
 
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Old 01-21-03, 06:32 PM
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schong02176,

I would hire a good all-around handman, that seems that's all you need. If you are doing the electrical and mounting the fan, it sounds more like help in getting it mounted in roof, best place for it.

If needed, and to make sure that you are assured that a roof application is leak proof, hire a roofer - don't need you falling off a roof!

With what you say about the soffits, I would forego this option.

Hope this helps!
 
 

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