remodeling bath


  #1  
Old 03-10-03, 07:14 PM
ohiojrfan
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Question remodeling bath

Ok....where to begin. Im in the process of redoing my bathroom. I've taken down all the cabinets, light fixtures etc. and stripped the wallpaper to the bare walls. Im thinking about ripping out our fiberglass tub with surrounds. They have been installed for awhile (they look that way anyways!). Ive premeasured the tub I have now, the opening the new tub will go into and the all-in-one tub/surround at the local HD store. My problem is this. Im completely clueless when it comes to this stuff. Im not sure how to go about taking out the tub (removing the fixtures/drain etc). I only have one bathroom in my house, so I can't afford to make a lot of mistakes. I hope someone can at least get me started and be there for lots of questions along the way.
 
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Old 03-10-03, 08:25 PM
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ohiojrfan,

It sounds as though the existing is a one pc. that was intalled when the home was built. Normally a 1 pc. could not be installed after because it would not fit through a traditional size bathroom door.

Most acrylic type units have a nailing flange and depending on your wall coverings, you have drywall. This was probably butted right up to the finished raised exposed surface of your unit.

Removal can be messy and time consuming but will require the minimum of the following tools;

Crowbar
Sawzall (reciprocating saw)
Hammer
Utility Knife
Pipe Wrench or adjustable wrench for pipe fittings
Electric Drill and drill bits
Hole Saw (for redrilling the holes for your faucet assembly)

Take a look at this site for some additional ideas as to what you are getting into;

http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projec...th_2.htm#walls

If you have removed the drywall you will see the nailing flanges. If not, remove the drywall, the nailing flange will be visible. At this point removing either nails or screws can be done. "Don't forget to shut water off to your supply lines and remove faucet cover, handles. The drain assembly will also have to be disconnected"

Use the sawzall to cut the tub in sections - BE CAREFULL NOT TO CUT INTO ANY ELECTRICAL WIRES OR WATER LINES - USE A SHORT BLADE.

***I would recommend a minimum 2 pc replacement if not 3 when reinstalling a new unit. You have to be able to get it into the bathroom. a 1 pc will not work unless you know for sure you have enough clearances al the way into the bathroom and if not, you'll be taking it back to the store***

Following the directions per the manufacture for installation. Lack of support causes squeaks, in some cases leaks at drain pipe fittings and worst of all cracks in the finish material. Most manufacturers recommend or suggest installing a mortar base support under the tub bottom before setting the tub in place. You can use either a bag of Quikcrete or a 5 gallon pail of pre-mix joint compound. ( usually I use the pre-mix 5 gallon...lazy and it's less mess) You can lay poly down under the tub prior to doing this to prevent any moisture issues while this is drying.

When this sets up, usually with 24-48 hours, your tub bottom will be rock solid supported. This does 2 things, prevents any possibility of potential cracking within the fiberglass/acrylic and eliminates any movement at the tub drain assembly or potential leaks that could happen.

Ensure that you do not get any around the tub drain assembly should you need to do anything down the line. In most cases, the holes cut for the drain lines will keep any base support away from it.

Finishing the project is another story . When you need more help...let us know! Hope all this helps!
 
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Old 03-11-03, 05:50 AM
ohiojrfan
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My existing tub was apparently installed later. It is a fiberglass tub and then there are five separate pieces of surround above it. Its a caulking/silicon nightmare! Im wondering if I can just remove the surround and replace that with tile. I think that may be easier than ripping out the entire tub and praying the new one will fit into the existing hole. The problem I have is time. This is the only bathroom in the house and its me, my husband and our teenage daughter! I know tile takes time to cure so showers are out of the question. Can you still bathe in the tub while the tiles cure or is it better to not have water anywhere near it? Thank you for your patience and help. I really appreciate it!
 
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Old 03-11-03, 06:21 AM
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ohiojrfan,

I have to say that NO WATER should be near it. No matter how you look at it, whether it be a new tub or just replacing the surround with tile, it is going to require set/curing time. Ceramic tile will create more time before you can use this than installing fiberglass. It may be a good idea to schedule a weekend trip, use a neighbors shower while doing your project. I realize that this is an inconvenience but it is one that you can live with.

If I can make one suggestion, if you're going to do this, change out the tub too. It doesn't make sense after all this work you have done already to put up with the existing fiberglass tub that is old and then have all this new stuff around it. You might just as well make plans to be at odds for a couple of days.

If you are wondering about the new tub not fitting, tear off some drywall at each end and measure stud to stud. This will confirm what you need. Go back to the store and purchase what is needed. If any adjustments have to be made, they can be done easily with shims. I doubt that you'll need to enlarge the space at all.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-11-03, 03:26 PM
ohiojrfan
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quick question...
Do they sell vanity tops with the sink offset on one side? Im thinking of a 48 inch top (36inch base w/12 in drawer cabinet) that has the sink offset with approx. 22.5 inch from left side to center. Is this possible?
 
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Old 03-11-03, 05:03 PM
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ohiojrfan,

The answer is yes. In some cases though a special order is required. Below is one example of what is available without special order.

http://www.swanstone.com/architects/spec05.php

http://www.swanstone.com/products/va...owls/index.php

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 03-13-03, 06:04 AM
ohiojrfan
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ok... an update...
The tub is out, drywall is gone and everything removed. We now have a problem. The existing overflow piping we have is too short to fit the new tub. (just go to the plumbing supply store with measurements, they should have new one, right?) The spigot pipe is not moveable. Im thinking we won't be able to get the new tub in place with it there. Our current piping is not the "normal" height. The shower is only approx 73 inches from the floor. Can I add pipe to make it higher? This will move the spigot pipe so that I will be able to get the tub in, etc. Please tell me this is possible!
 
  #8  
Old 03-13-03, 06:29 AM
ohiojrfan
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Here's a link to the tub I bought. the measurements all fit great, but I still don't know what to do about the spigot pipe. When I measure the height from the floor for the on/off lever (circular with handle to regulate water,one piece) the current pipe has it as 23-24 inches from the floor. That cuts right into the edge of the tub where the surround attaches. I really don't want to cut into the edge of the tub/surround because of the leakage potential I would create. This is another reason to try to raise up the pipes. Argggggggh!!! I think Im in way over my head!! Everything that could go wrong, has!!

http://www.sterlingplumbing.com/onli...d_num=71021120
 
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Old 03-13-03, 07:12 AM
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ohiojrfan,

With a new tub installation, you would have to buy an new drain assembly for your tub. It's like a toilet, the toilet seat is seperate. This would include the new overflow. They are adjustable to fit most anything you buy.

Second, the faucet assembly is usually replaced as if it is as old as the original, it's the best time to change it. Tub spout locations would be based upon the new tub you purchased. I am assuming that you didn't get a plumber for any of this so you are right, you went over your head on this one but there is no harm in trying. I give everyone credit for trying but there are some issues that must be done by a professional if you are unfamiliar with the entire process involved.

I don't know if you have galvanized pipes now or copper but I would get a plumber in to make the necessary changes and let them install the tub, drain assembly and new faucet unless you intend to use the existing but I advise putting in a new one - anti-scald - pressure temperature balancing as per code. It's a good safety issue. If you had mentioned that you were not comfortable with the plumbing, we could have given some pointers but you still may not had been able to do it, it's too late now.

Good Luck!
 
 

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