Bathroom fan exhaust


  #1  
Old 10-03-03, 08:30 AM
epic69
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Bathroom fan exhaust

I have a very old house with slate tile roofing (very hard to cut through) Is it ok to vent a bathroom fan to the outside wall? I am also installing new bathroom upstairs where i have no outside wall to vent to. my only option if I want the vent to go up is through the roof. What is the best option for cutting through a slate roof to make a vent?
 
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Old 10-03-03, 11:23 AM
jpe55071
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It is possible to vent out the exterior wall. There are complete kits avaliable for this at most home improvment stores. ($10 - $12)

Also you may not need to go through the roof with your upstairs bathroom. Depending on where your main stack is located, (usually directly behind the toilet) you could tie into that for your venting. This is ussually already vented through the roof.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 11:37 AM
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Old 10-07-03, 05:47 AM
epic69
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I really like the venting idea into the main plumbing vent stack. Did not know you could do that. that will work great, the upstairs bathroom has easy access to the main vent stack. Although it is cast iron now, I will be replacing it with PVC because I need to tie into to it anyways for a new bathroom install.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 06:38 AM
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epic69,

I like to insert a heed of warning on this issue of tying into a "Waste Vent" stack for venting an exhaust fan.

These waste gases can return by the exhaust fan duct and return back into the home. Besides being on the smelly side, these can be toxic. There are no provisions to avoid backdrafting which could force these gases back into the home.

1. What jpe55071 is suggesting is not Code Approved and this can be confirmed by calling your local authorities on the Mechanical Codes in force, 401.7 and MRC Chapter 303.1 (Using the IRC as guideline).

2. Installation of a bathroom exhaust fan must be done according to the Exhaust Fan Manufacturers Specifications and this states that all venting and exhaust must be done to the "exterior of the structure" via flexible or metal ductwork.

Reconsider your options here as what is suggested is not legal nor healthy.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 06:42 AM
epic69
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Thanks for the reply. I will heed your warning, I dont think I will do the venting in the plumbing stack.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 06:46 AM
epic69
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So now back to my original question being in the upstairs bathroom I have no outside wall at that elevation that I can vent to. Only choice is through the roof (Which is slate tile). so now then. How the heck can I cut a hole in my roof without splitting existing tiles all to heck. I think I am SOL.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 06:50 AM
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epic69,

Holes can be made in slate tile but it takes special tools, hire a pro is option but not a cheap one.

What do you have for soffits or fascia - any gutters?
 
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Old 10-07-03, 08:11 AM
epic69
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I have solid wood soofits and fascia. Old victorian house. I have approx 18" overhang so plenty of room I think to put the vent in the soffit, didnt know that I could take the vent up and then down into the soffit.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 09:30 AM
jpe55071
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I'm sorry for the poor advice. Didn't think about the back draft. I guess it's a daily learning experiance for me.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 11:58 AM
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jpe55071,

No problem as we all learn new things, even I. I just want to make sure that the right info is passed on that is correct. Last thing we need is to find out that someone is severly sick or worse. Not always am I able to intervene on such critical issues but luckily, this was done here.

Just remember that correct information is vital in responding to questions posted. As a Moderator, my job is to help, not criticize. We all make mistakes but we all can learn to correct them.

Keep posting!
 
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Old 10-07-03, 12:25 PM
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epic69,

These articles should help in your application,

http://www.shopfnc.com/bathfan1.htm

http://www.llbuildingproducts.com/ll...hfanpict0.html

http://www.gordonmorrow.com/recent% 20projects/venting_ester.htm (This is a good example of what you could do, via under the soffit)

http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=howT...c=howToLibrary (Another good example)

http://shop.cornerhardware.com/howto/ht064.html

Main rules to follow,

Exhaust airflow must take the air all the way to the outside of the building.

Duct runs should be short and as straight as possible.

Use smooth, rigid ducting whenever possible.

Slope ducting to the outside to allow any condensation to weep to the outside of the building.

Ducting running through unheated spaces must be insulated.

Exhaust hoods must prevent birds or animals from entering.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-07-03, 12:47 PM
epic69
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Thanks you have been most helpful. I will check out all those links.
Thanks again everybody.
 
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Old 10-07-03, 12:52 PM
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epic69,

You're very welcome!

Let us know how you're made out!
 
 

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