Clothes Chute


  #1  
Old 10-25-03, 07:23 AM
dsiegris
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Question Clothes Chute

I have been trying to find a clothes chute to install in my home. I have been unsuccessful. Can anyone tell me where I can find this device?

Thanks!
D
 
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Old 10-25-03, 08:00 AM
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I'm not sure there is a ready-made chute. They've been discussed here before but I don't recall anyone ever referring to one that can be installed as a pre-made. If you're handy you should be able to make one from scratch. Heating/AC ducting material would be a good start. If you post back with what you have in mind for the installation you should get some additional ideas/suggestions.
 
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Old 10-25-03, 11:38 AM
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dsiegris,

Just a note, as far as I know and with discussions with local building officials, clothes chutes are not allowed per fire codes. These have been banned for years. No way to contain fire once it starts up the shaft.

Contact your local building official for confirmation.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-25-03, 05:14 PM
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Good point, Doug. Clothes chutes have come up either here or another forum before, but I don't recall anyone bringing up code problems.
 
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Old 10-27-03, 04:44 PM
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Clothes Chute is OK to have!

dsiegris,

Just to let everyone know, I consulted with the City Engineer and to my amazement, clothes chutes are considered OK to be installed as long as it is protected within a concealed space.

This means that you are ALLOWED to install them. Apparently, there is a misconception and I too was told that it was a fire hazard.

After some thought I called to reaffirm with an Engineer on the issue versus a Building Inspector. This is considered a viable venture and install it where you like.

Sorry for misinformation.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-28-03, 05:37 PM
dsiegris
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Talking Thanks

This weekend I will be attempting to install the clothes chute. Any tips on how to line-up the hole in the wall with the hole at the bottom?
 
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Old 10-28-03, 06:32 PM
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dsiegris,

It's going to take some exact measuring for sure. At least one thing is known, it's going to be vertical! Slight humor.

I would say once you establish the shaft location and hopefully you have a good idea where this is at, it is a matter of ensuring that it is a true unobstructed shaft.

There is no simple answer to this as you will have to determine the location and if need be drill some holes to get things lined up.

You'll have to determine what you will use to line the inside to ensure that clothes don't get hung up.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 10-28-03, 07:59 PM
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Re: Thanks

Originally posted by dsiegris
This weekend I will be attempting to install the clothes chute. Any tips on how to line-up the hole in the wall with the hole at the bottom?

A laser level sounds like it's perfect for the task. Or, if you are working from the top, downwards, you could use a plumb bob.


My question is why you would need to line-up the holes? I am assuming you are taking space from a closet or room.

Most homes don't have "secret passageways" or double-plated walls. If the space isn't part of a room, closet or hallway, it's usually inside a 2x4 wall cavity.
 
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Old 10-28-03, 08:44 PM
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Cool

All of the clothes chutes that I have seen are made of A grade plywood (no surface defects), and are not necessarily perfectly vertical.
Some have had offsets, and as long as the chute is large enough, nothing should get hung up in it, but the upper access needs to be "child-proof" for safety.
They are allowed here, although I've heard the fire safety issue discussed before. That's what smoke alarms are for. If you're concerned, just put one above the top of the chute.
Good Luck!
 
  #10  
Old 10-31-03, 05:00 PM
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Clothes chutes

My chute is made out of heat duct material. We had one installed by the builder in my daughter's new home, and the builder used the same material for hers.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 07:46 AM
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They blue-boarded mine...

We have a chute from the 2nd floor to the 1st floor laundry, they just used pieces of sheetrock (blueboard actually) to line the inside of the shute, and put a hinged door on the top. I've never had anything hang-up in it.

Dan
 
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Old 11-08-03, 03:33 PM
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A large heat duct, melimine, anything that is smoth should work. I have my doubts about plywood (even AB) it's going to eventually wear a bit and will snag the clothes (sorry Mike).
 
 

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