plaster on a bathroom ceiling over mold!!!


  #1  
Old 01-04-04, 09:40 PM
lisahodak
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Unhappy plaster on a bathroom ceiling over mold!!!

Hello--

I am starting to re-do a bathroom and I came across a huge mess...I noticed that the previous home owners decided to plaster over a moldy ceiling. I am trying to take down the plaster, so I can wash it and put KILZ over it...

Is there an easier way to get down this plaster than a putty knife and my fingers??

Any help would be appreciated!!!

Thanks!!!
 
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Old 01-05-04, 06:04 AM
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What exactly do you mean by plaster? Also how do you know that someone put something over mold. Are you saying that someone put a texture on the ceiling? I'm just confused. The only way to remove plaster is with a sledge hammer.
 
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Old 01-05-04, 08:32 AM
lisahodak
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what I mean is that someone plastered over the original texture of the ceiling to conceal the mold that was on it...So right now I have 2 different textures of ceiling in the bathroom...One over the showerstall, (Where the mold is located at) and a different texture over the rest of the bathroom...I should have said that someone took joint compound and put it over the moldy ceiling and I am trying to find an easier way to take the joint compound off the ceiling to be able to treat the mold...Trust me, with everything else we have found in this house, they didn't treat the mold
 
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Old 01-05-04, 02:00 PM
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OK. Sorry to say there is no way to scape it off. You could sand it down with a belt sander but what a mess. In my opinion you should remove the ceiling and hang new sheetrock. Also that way you can see if there is any water damage to the floor/ceiling joists.
 
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Old 01-05-04, 02:51 PM
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You should also try to figure out if this is an old mold stain or you have other problems. It would be a shame to put in a nice new ceiling and still fight moisture problems.
 
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Old 01-05-04, 05:43 PM
lisahodak
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thanks for your comments and help to this problem that I have...

This might be a very stupid question, but I am willing to pay the consequences here....

Is Sheetrock actually rock??? Or is it a form of drywall?? Would the ceiling be difficult to take down?? What should I take it down with??

I know what the problem in that bathroom is...The shower is enclosed (glass doors) and the moisture gets trapped in there when we take a shower in that bathroom, plus it doesn't help that both of our bathrooms are small...probably smaller than most of your closet space in your home...We have a fan in the bathroom, but that doesn't seem to help the situation in there much....

again...thanks for all your help!!!
 
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Old 01-05-04, 09:21 PM
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There's no such thing as stupid question although my kids often think my answers qualify.

Sheetrock is actually compressed gypsum with a paper backing on both sides. You can buy it in 1/4", 1/2", or 5/8" thick sheets measuring 4'x8' or 4'x12'. White sheetrock is used in most applications. Greenboard (green sheetrock) has been treated to provide some amount of moisture resistance. It's often used in bathrooms and kitchens. Another type is called blueboard. It's seldom used around here, so I'm not sure what makes it different.

Sheetrock has pretty much replaced lath and plaster as a wall material. It's much easier (i.e. cheaper) to install and finish. You put it up in large pieces and attach it with nails or screws, use drywall tape and compound (mud) on the joints and nail/screw heads, texture if desired and you're ready for paint.

Regarding your shower. Does the enclosure go all the way to the ceiling? If it does, you need to do something to get rid of the moisture as quickly as possible after you shower. If your ceiling fans are ineffective, you need to install higher capacity (more cfm) fans. You may even need to install a fan in the ceiling above the shower.

If you haven't done it before, I would suggest that you leave drywall removal to someone with experience. It's not difficult, but if you have insulation above it, you might wind up with piles of insulation falling on you and all over the bathroom.
 
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Old 01-06-04, 08:34 AM
lisahodak
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Hello again!!!

My glass doors are about 3/4 the way up the wall, so it pretty much encompasses the whole wall space....

I figured there was a problem with the mold in there about a yr ago when I went to paint in there, and was ripping down wallpaper, and found a good portion of one wall with mold on it...Something else the previous owners didn't tell us about...THey were good at doing that...Not upkeeping the interior of the house, and not telling us about problems they had here

On the one side of the shower, is a 1/4 sheet of drywall, by the toilet, which is damaged, and on the other side of the shower are built in cabinets that go from the floor to the ceiling, so that area is pretty much enclosed....

Do I need backerboard or something to go behind the sheetrock?? Would I install this on the walls in there as well, and not the greenboard?? I just like to have all my bases covered here because I don't want someone coming in here and doing something again that is incorrect or trying to play me like a fool, as most of the people do at Home Depot....
 
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Old 01-06-04, 01:17 PM
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This is beginning to sound like the bathroom from hell. I've made a fair amount of money from these.

If you have an opening at the top of your shower enclosure, that's great. You probably just need a fan with a higher flow rate (cfm). Put in as much of a fan as you can. In bathrooms, there ain't no such thing as too much exhaust flow.

The walls are a tougher question. If the drywall isn't too badly disintegrated, it can be left alone. I would wash the moldy spots with a bleach solution to kill the mold. Don't saturate it, just wipe it down and let it dry.

Bad spots in the drywall can be patched or replaced with new pieces. I would use greenboard for any replacement drywall, and you don't need any kind of backerboard behind it. Use 1-1/4" drywall screws instead of nails. Screws don't pop out like nails do.

Use drywall tape and compound to cover all joints, seams, and screw heads. I would avoid using the moisture resistant drywall compound. It's actually better in this application, but it's more difficult to sand smooth since it has a "rubbery" texture when it's dry.

Once you have the walls in decent shape, use a good primer paint with a fungicide in it. Then paint with a good quality paint with more fungicide in it.

When you're all finished, never shower without running the fan and let it run for a few minutes after you're done. The idea is to get the humidity level down as quickly as possible.

Good Luck

Oh yes, be really careful asking questions at Home Depot type stores. Many of those people barely know where things are, let alone how they're used.
 
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Old 01-06-04, 07:35 PM
lisahodak
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Hello once again!!!

Actually, the wall that is in question (drywall) that has mold on it is in pretty bad shape...I am going to tear that wall out of there so I am able to put in a tub and an enclosure in the near future, as well as tearing out those built in cabinets in there to get a 60" tub in there....

One more question...About the ceiling...would I be able to put up 1/4" drywall and cover it with masonite?? I heard that you can get textured masonite in white, which might be a little cheaper, as well as easier for 2 people to do, compared to people holding sheetrock up to the studs...Would I be able to do that or is there a good chance that the mold can get up there as well?? Someone mentioned it to me, and I was just curious if that would work as well.....

Thanks again for answering all my questions...At least I am getting good advice here and not the type of advice or service I get at Home Depot....
 
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Old 01-07-04, 07:36 AM
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Since you're planning to pretty much blow out the entire bathroom, I would rip the ceiling as well. Watch for loose insulation in the ceiling - it will pour all over the place when you take out the ceiling drywall. If that happens, just toss it out with the rest of the trash.

With the ceiling opened up, you can now install a good ceiling fan and relocate it if necessary. I wouldn't put it directly over the shower but closer might give you better removal of warm, moist air. Also make sure the fan exhausts outside - not into an attic space. That just moves the moisture problem into your attic.

When it's time to close the ceiling back up, put in batt type insulation (paper side toward the room) between the ceiling joists. If the joists are 2"x6", use R-19. If they're 2"x4" use R-11. I staple string to the bottom of the joists to hold it in place.

Use 5/8" drywall (greenboard) for the ceiling. The 1/2" stuff can sag slightly in time and your ceiling will have "ripples" where the the drywall is attached to the ceiling joists.

With the walls open;

1. Do any plumbing required for your new tub faucet and drain. You may need to install a temperature balanced faucet to meet code.

2. Do all required/desired electrical work. Add/relocate receptacles, lighting, switches, etc. Make sure the wiring is up to code regarding GFCI protection.

3. Insulate any exterior walls with R-19 or R-11 batts (paper side in) depending on stud dimensions. Don't try to stuff R-19 into a 4" stud cavity. Compressing insulation reduces its effectivness.

4. If you want to add some sound deadening (between a bedroom and the bathroom, for example) put batts in these walls, too.

When you close the walls;

1. Hang plastic sheeting on the walls around the tub/shower. Go floor to ceiling and overlap the plastic by the width of a stud cavity. I staple the plastic to the studs and use duct tape to cover the staples. The plastic is a vapor barrier to keep moisture out of the walls.

2. Install the tub. Since there's still a lot of work to do over the tub, I put a drop cloth over the tub and cut a piece of 3/4" plywood to cover the tub completely.

3. If you're going to tile the walls around the tub/shower, install a backerboard product where you plan to tile. There are several choices here so you'll need to decide which to use. Don't use greenboard even if it's legal. You'll get a better tile job with a backerboard system.

4. Install 1/2" drywall - preferably greenboard - on all other walls. If you're going with a solid surface material around the tub/shower, use greenboard on those walls, too.

5. Tape and mud the drywall and you're ready to start thinking about paint, wallpaper, or whatever.

Here's where I drop out of the advice business. I've put up with over 30 years of abuse from "she-who-must-be-obeyed" and HER daughters regarding my sense of design, taste, etc. I'm required to do all the grunt work, but am banned from any discussions regarding paint colors, wallpaper patterns, etc. I am allowed to handle wood trim and moldings.

Hope this helps.
 
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Old 01-07-04, 02:02 PM
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To answer your question, no. Don't put 1/4" drywall on the ceiling. It will be weak and wavy. Whatever you put over the drywall will be wavy too, especially masonite. Put 1/2 inch up, finish it slick or textured(whatever you want) and paint it with a good bathroom paint.
 
 

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