Wood FLOORS IN BATHROOM


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Old 07-11-04, 03:38 PM
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Wood FLOORS IN BATHROOM

We are looking at houses to buy. We saw a nice house today that was recently updated but the BATHROOM FLOORS had wood floors. I have never seen Wood floors in the bathroom. I would appreciate any feedback on your thoughts on having wood floors in bathrooms.
 
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Old 07-11-04, 06:53 PM
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My guess is that the wood floors are ok in a half bathroom but not in an Main bathroom where there is a shower.

If the wood floors are not ok, is there a way to replace the floor with tile. Can tile just go over the wood. How would it be done.
 
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Old 07-11-04, 09:49 PM
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DODGE621,

Wood floors in bathrooms is not my recommendation but nonetheless, clients like it even though they regret it later. If this was one of the updates, then it was done with the intent of appealing to a potential buyer, not a user of the bathroom. There are more con's than pro's to this venture.

Major concerns are of course "water". The other issue is the "High Humidty" levels which can raise havoc on wood flooring. As too little moisture is a problem, then the opposite is another problem. Cupping or swelling of the floor can be an issue. This happens and any crack, crevise is a disaster waiting to happen.

Depending on how the floors are finished determines how well they will stand up. Standing water will create spots if not wiped up immediately. Assorted bathroom chemicals like toilet cleaners, shampoos and some conditioners will cause problems as well.

If you have children, depending on their age, will determine who can follow instructions. This also applies to adults. Some instructions as to what not to do and what to do are not readily followed routinely.

If there is any doubt that this will be a problem, then 2 options are available.

1. Remove existing wood flooring and install 1/2" cement board then your tile application. This will be a task and depending on how the wood flooring was installed - like under the vanity or not and the same regarding the toilet, will also make it a task but not impossible to correct.

2. Lay 1/2" cement board over your hardwood but then consider the reverse of #1. Building up may mean adding and extension to your toilet flange piping and then you have to consider the door bottom clearance and moldings. Cutting and repositioning will be an issue. My concern is that you are having layer upon layer of material and this could be a problem as time passes.

If this all was not enough of concern, then consider also that all this work would and should be planned out. If the bathroom needs to have the tub replaced and or toilet, it would be a good time to do it now which means that #1 should be followed and install everything properly.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 07-12-04, 06:38 AM
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Thank you Doug. The rest of the bathroom is new and in good condition. I just want to make sure that it would be possible to replace teh floor with tile. The walls itself are tiled 1/2 way and then painted. I just want to be sure that the wood floor can be changed to tile without having to open the walls from the ceiling of the 1st floor of the house which is directly below the 2nd floor. If you do not perceive it being a problem then I am willing to spend the money to tile the floor.
 
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Old 07-12-04, 08:29 AM
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DODGE621,

You're very welcome!

As long as you understand what I posted, do so as you wish.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 07-12-04, 12:33 PM
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I am not sure I exactly understand. But as long as I will not have to cut out the 2nd floor from the ceiling 1st floor, it should be ok. I may hire a contractor to do this. I did have someone else tell me today

"You are corect - wood floors in bathroom are unusual. It would depend on
type of wood and protection it has as to how long it would last.

Changing to a tile floor is the thing to do. If walls are not tiled this
should be done around tub and shower as well as half way up wall behind sink
and toilet area. Rest - your option.

You could leave tub/sink/toilet in place and have contractor remove wood
floor. He would then make sure underlayment is in good shape for "Mud" floor
that tile would be layed on.

Average bathroom coast for this (if not in bad shape) is approximately
$2,000. depending on tile, size of bathroom, etc. But if you fiquired on
2,000 to 2,500 you probably would be right."

Do you agree with this Doug or anyone else?
 
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Old 07-12-04, 03:14 PM
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DODGE621,

Don't know who suggested that if any work needed to be done on second would have to be accessed from first floor but that is not the case. All work can be done from within the bathroom on second floor UNLESS plumbing issues are in question but most times, plumbing can be done from above.

Depending on how you install the tile, i.e. removing the existing wood and then applying a "mud base" then tile, the toilet flange would be higher than it is now. Tub could stay but toilet flange would have to be raised.

If you removed the wood flooring and installed 1/2" Cement board and then tile, toilet flange would be in about the same height so all is ok with this.

Regarding the average bathroom cost for tile, I am not sure where you are getting the cost of $2,000 - $2,500 but the cost would vary on size of tile, method of substrate and total square footage. Best thing is to get bids on this from at least 3 contractors and see what they say.

Hope this helps!
 
 

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