Handicapped accessible bathroom leakage


  #1  
Old 08-20-04, 12:49 PM
kmith
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Handicapped accessible bathroom leakage

I'm putting a wheelchair accessible bathroom into new construction and I'm concerned about water leakage and related problems.

Showers for wheelchairs have just a 2" lip, so they're easy to roll into. That means, though, that water can easily splash out. I want to avoid dryrot and mildew. What should I do?

Greenboard and mildew resistent paint on the walls?
Cement backer board and vinyl on the floor?
 
  #2  
Old 08-20-04, 05:40 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
kmith,

Roll-in showers can be more difficult to install and you are right the floor will get wet.

Ceramic Tile roll-in showers use the same basic procedures as used for a shower with a curb, just different. There is additional work required as you will need to install a floor drain. In some cases, 2 drains are used, one inside the shower and one outside. Most importantly, as you are concerned about is how to ensure that water doesn't damage anything, the item of a pan liner. These come in varying widths, usually 3' and 5' widths. This is done by installing a rubber shower pan and the new shower floor flush with the existing bathroom floor. The premier shower pan membrane used today is a flexible plastic made from chlorinated polyethylene (CPE). I have used it countless times.

Special clamping ring drains must be used with shower pan membranes. These plumbing fittings have adjustable finished drains that allow you to adapt them to a wide variety of cement setting beds and tile thicknesses.

The CPE or PVC membranes attach to the drain in the same manner that a rubber washer is sandwiched between a nut and a bolt. Once the clamping portion of the drain is tightened, all water that collects in the pan is directed to hidden weep holes within the drain fitting.

To prevent future leaks, you need to make sure the sub-floor beneath the liner slopes to the drain. If the liner is placed on a wood sub-floor, make sure all nail heads are recessed and there are no large splinters that could puncture the membrane. Small washed gravel needs to be placed over the weep holes as well. If you fail to do this, the cement base that supports the tile can clog these vital pathways that lead to the drain.

The floor and shower area for your wheelchair shower needs a special CPE liner that has fibers molded into it. These fibers allow thinset adhesive to be used directly over the membrane instead of a thick cement base. The thinset adhesive is like brick mortar and it readily adheres to the membrane's fibrous texture. If you follow the manufacturer's installation instructions, both of your showers will be leak free for years.

Prefabricated, fiberglass/acrylic roll-in shower floors can be considered. They can replace and are available in the same size as your standard 5" tub, and comes with a right or left hand drain. This makes it easier since no jack hammering is required and only minimal drain adjustment is needed. If you have the room, these units are also available in assorted sizes.

SHOWER BASES;

http://www.theswancorp.com/products/...oors/index.php

http://products.jacuzzi.com/nd/SbsProdInfo.d2w/main

http://www.lascobath.com/showerpans.htm

http://www.theswancorp.com/showerfloors.html

http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatal...ower+Receptors

http://www.asbcorp.com/category.cfm?catid=4

Depending on what you are thinking of for wall finishes, if tile, go cement board for all of tiled area and greenboard for everything else. You have other options for walls, i.e. solid surface panels, fiberglass panel kits, etc.

Hope this helps!
 
  #3  
Old 08-20-04, 08:07 PM
kmith
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post Waterproofing handicap accessible shower

Hi Doug,

Thank you for your detailed reply. As you suggest, I am planning to use a fiberglass shower. Both Home Depot and Lowe's sell wheelchair accessible showers. HD sells Lasco FreedomLine and Lowe's sells AquaGlass SpecialCare. Since this is new construction, there is room for a 3' x 5' unit.

I am still confused about what to do about water proofing the floor. I don't want to have a tile floor. Hard tile can create a safety hazard. I would prefer high-grade vinyl. I think that would lead to a soft, waterproof floor. Your idea of a second drain outside the shower is very good. But how do I secure the edges? How do I create a slope that tilts toward the second drain?

K.
 
  #4  
Old 08-20-04, 08:34 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
kmith,

I think this will help. This is one project that I designed but it isn't done yet.

http://pictureposter.allbrand.nu/pic...0IN%20SHOWERS/

The floor tile is skid resistant as it is better than anything else. I can get some sketches of the floor but I need more time to do this.

Does this help?
 
  #5  
Old 08-20-04, 08:44 PM
kmith
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Wheelchair accessible shower

Doug,

Thanks for the pics. Your project looks very nice with an all-tile design.
Would you comment a bit on why you chose tile?
Is fiberglass and vinyl a viable option?

Thank,

K.
 
  #6  
Old 08-20-04, 08:56 PM
Doug Aleshire's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 4,455
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
k,

I choose tile because the client wanted it and I insisted on it!

The clients whose wife has MS and is getting worse but she is great at interior design. She wanted tile throughout and I selected tile that would be safe for her and others assisting her so a skid resistant tile is important. It also looks nice.

However, fiberglass roll in bases are very durable if done correctly, easy to clean and can last for years. In either case, each requires the front to be built up to maintain some control of water escaping but as I said the 2 floor drains are a safety factor here. This is why I mentioned the shower pan liner material. By the way, there is a basement under this part of the home. The bedroom area is on a slab.

Vinyl flooring in a situation like this would be an issue for me. I don't like call backs and if this is torn, or the adhesives start to give way, we are looking at a problem. If this were a traditional bathroom, vinyl would be acceptable. A roll in shower facility is altogether another story.

Does this help?
 
  #7  
Old 08-21-04, 12:07 AM
kmith
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
wheelchair accessible bathroom

Doug,

Thank you so much for the excellent explanations. I'll check into a tile floor further.

K.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: