Tile to pre formed shower.......


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Old 09-06-04, 04:06 PM
D
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Tile to pre formed shower.......

I have a tile shower enclosure and need to replace it. I want a pre formed shower wall enclosure. Do I have to remove the tile or can I put the shower enclosure in on top of it? I realize the top and sides of the tile would have to be removed to hide it and that proper caulking/sealing would need to be done. Good idea or bad idea? Pros/cons? thanks!
 
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Old 09-06-04, 07:32 PM
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ddayton217,

I am assuming that you are talking about a pre-fab shower. These are designed and I stress, "designed" to be attached directly to the wall studs. What you have should be stripped dwon to the studs and then install as per manufacturer directions.

There are numerous ones out there, take a look at these links,

SHOWER MANUFACTURER LINKS;
http://www.asbcorp.com/index.cfm

http://www.americanstandard-us.com/P...&brandID=1,2,3

http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/showering.jsp

http://www.sterlingplumbing.com/onli...m=professional

http://www.jacuzzi.com/category/prod_fam_showers.html

I personally like Lasco...
http://www.lascobath.com/browse.pl?l...html&series=11

The acrylics have a 5 year warranty. Gelcoats have a 3 year.

Kohler is another great product and I would go with ...
http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatal...Shower+Modules

Acrylic units are usually constructed using large sheets of solid colored acrylic plastic. These sheets are heated so that they soften. The softened sheets are then stretched over a mold to achieve the desired shape of the shower or tub unit. This stretching process, however, sometimes causes the acrylic to be very thin as it stretches around corners. Those units with the highest percent of acrylic tend to offer higher performance levels. Repairs to these units are not always successful.

Many homeowners in the past were dissatisfied with the fact that the floors of these units flexed like oil cans. Some of the acrylic units backed with composites have addressed this problem. The other units often need to be set in wet plaster (5 gal pail of pre-mixed joint compound) or mortar to provide a solid base. This may be required or recommended in the installation instructions.


Hope this helps!
 
 

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