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how to instal a medicine cabinet in a load bearing wall

how to instal a medicine cabinet in a load bearing wall


  #1  
Old 10-04-04, 03:49 PM
Janer_j
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how to instal a medicine cabinet in a load bearing wall

am wanting to install a recessed medicine cabinet into a load bearing wall. I understand that making one that is larger that the space between the wall studs woudl be ver complicated so I am thinking about designing something wit a narrow cabinet but the mirror on the outside will be much wider. I was thinking about three mirror panels, framed all the way around with the centre panel opening with the side panels remained fixed on the wall. Any suggestions on the backing material for the mirrors including the one that would be the door to the cabinet? I am not sure how the secure the side panels to the wall and am wondering about a way to frame the shelving on the inside. Any suggestions would be helpful.
 
  #2  
Old 10-05-04, 06:29 AM
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Janer_j,

Is the wall that this is going into, a 2x4 or 2x6 (plumbing wall)?

Are there any pipes running vertical behind this?

Can't very well do a recessed without knowing more.

Is there any reason that you can't place a surface mount MC on the wall of the size you have or itend to buy?

Just wondering
 
  #3  
Old 10-06-04, 03:02 PM
Janer_j
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I believe it is a 2X4 and we currently have a hole in the drywall where the cabinet would go (between the wall studs, narrow and tall). There are no pipes in the way although there is a sink below the hole. I am interested in a recessed cabinet because the vanity is not very deep and when you enter the room, you would immediately see the side of the cabinet coming out quite far over the sink -really a matter of esthetics.
 
  #4  
Old 10-06-04, 04:02 PM
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Janer_j,

I understand.

Since this is a load bearing wall and only a 2x4 and assuming the MC is wider than 14 1/2", then by rights, a header should be installed. The depth of the cabinet is assuming to be 3" or 3 1/2" maximum.

I would opt for installing a header instead of going through a setup as you described. It would be nicer, more space available for storage and as you said, more pleasing to the eye. If done right, you should not have to do much patching if any once you install this. Of course, we have the "unknowns" until the wall is opened up more so you can center things accordingly.

Hope this helps!
 
  #5  
Old 10-07-04, 07:45 AM
Janer_j
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Thanks for the insight, but can you describe a header for me - clearly I am new at this
 
  #6  
Old 10-07-04, 08:16 AM
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Janer_j,

http://dougaphs.smugmug.com/gallery/244133

Refer to the window, not the door. You only need to place the header between the king studs and toenail into place.

Does this help?

Bear in mind that you don't need to go to extremes on placement of this as long as you are not going to have a 3 -4 ft wide medicine cabinet. What size are you intending to get?
 
  #7  
Old 10-12-04, 06:30 PM
Janer_j
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thinking about it being over 34 inches
 
  #8  
Old 10-12-04, 07:30 PM
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Janer_j,

No problem. Go for it.

Let us know how you made out.
 
 

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