New Bathroom, where to start?

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Old 10-15-04, 06:19 AM
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New Bathroom, where to start?

Recently bought our house, have been running around like an idiot trying to get all the little stuff done (take this weekend for example, have to install 2 chimney caps, hook up a water supply to the new fridge, fix some loose cloths racks in a closet, run RG59 for the bedroom TV and cable modem). The current bathroom is very small, and the previos owner was converting another room to a second bathroom (didn't get very far). These 2 rooms are adjacent to each other and I would like to remove the wall between them and have one big L shaped bathroom. This wall is maybe 5-6 feet in length and I don't believe it is load bearing (runs perpendicular to a larger bedroom wall on one side and kitchen wall on other side). How does one go about planning for a project like this? How would you determine the layout of tub, toilet, sinks to make the best use of the space? Any other pointers or advise?
 
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Old 10-15-04, 10:11 PM
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Davejb,

Send me an e-mail with all the information on what you have now for sizes of rooms and what you would like to do. Need to know if you can relocate some plumbing easily or not, how many fixtures, give me a "need", "want" and "wish" list. Does the current bathroom have a window-what type, size/location in room, do you need a toilet room, size and locations of doors, etc.

I can spare a look and then give you some ideas.

I will post all I compile back here for others to view.

Hope this helps!
 
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Old 10-16-04, 06:39 AM
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Dang Doug! I wish I'd known you were willing to do stuff like that before I started mine! That's super nice of you!!
Dave, I'm no expert but the first thing you've got to do is to determine for sure that it's not a load bearing wall. I'm in the midst of a very similar project & trying to do all the work myself. Tore down the wall between the only exsisting bath in the house and a small corner bedroom to make a larger bath & a laundry room. Getting together accurate measurements, window & door placements, plumbing locations, etc., as Doug suggested is the place to start. Then a wish or priority list of the features you have to have as well as those you'd like to incorporate into the new room.
The Kohler website and the Better Homes & Garden website both have free online programs with bath fixtures that you can use to get some ideas about a layout.
 
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Old 10-17-04, 04:57 PM
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I'm not sure what your budget is but think big for the future.

Higher end: Slipper claw foot tubs, steam showers and separate toilet rooms are very popular in higher end baths. If you don't have the budget for them now, you can run the rough plumbing and leave a space for the claw foot tub and put it in later when you have the money. Same for the steam shower. If you build the shower and put in the plumbing you can just wait a year or so before buying the steam generator.

Middle Price: I think tile really classes up a bath. It's not that expensive if you do it yourself (the material is cheap but it's labor intensive). Separate his & hers vanities add some class for a reasonable price (and it makes sure you get some room...). I also think a separate shower and tub (with the tub as a focal point in the room) looks nice. I'm not a big fan of the Jacuzzi tubs but they seem popular and add appeal when trying to sell.

Low end: Go for the size and layout of room you want, since that is difficult to upgrade in the future. You can replace the flooring or countertops in the future when you have the money. Don't go way cheap. Spending enough to get a good general quality is worth the difference. A little extra money on the low end gets you a lot. It's when you get to the high end that the quality/price curve gets steep.
 
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